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Q.

Yoga vasistha sums up the spiritual process into Seven Bhoomikas? what are they?

Tags: spiritual process, yoga vasistha, bhoomikas
Asked by sudhakar kuruvada, 07 Apr '13 06:40 pm
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Answers (6)

1.

Ubhecch (longing for the Truth): The yogi (or sdhaka) rightly distinguishes between permanent and impermanent; cultivates dislike for worldly pleasures; acquires mastery over his physical and mental organism; and feels a deep yearning to be free from Sasra.
Vicraa (right inquiry): The yogi has pondered over what he or she has read and heard, and has realized it in his or her life.
Tanumnasa (attenuation or thinning out of mental activities): The mind abandons the many, and remains fixed on the One.
Sattvpatti (attainment of sattva, "reality"): The Yogi, at this stage, is called Brahmavid ("knower of Brahman"). In the previous four stages, the yogi is subject to sacita, Prrabdha and gam forms of karma. He or she has been practicing Samprajta Samdhi (contemplation), in which the consciousness of duality still exists.
Asasakti (unaffected by anything): The yogi (now called Brahmavidvara) performs his or her necessary duties, without a sense of involvement.
Padrtha abhvana (sees Bra ...more
Answered by LIPSIKA, 07 Apr '13 06:42 pm

 
  
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2.

Ubhecch (longing for the Truth),Vicraa (right inquiry):,Tanumnasa (attenuation or thinning out of mental activities),Sattvpatti (attainment of sattva, "reality"),Asasakti (unaffected by anything),Padrtha abhvana (sees Brahman everywhere),Turya (perpetual samdhi):
Answered by Quest, 08 Apr '13 09:45 am

 
  
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3.

Ubhecch (longing for the Truth): The yogi (or sdhaka) rightly distinguishes between permanent and impermanent; cultivates dislike for worldly pleasures; acquires mastery over his physical and mental organism; and feels a deep yearning to be free from Sasra.
Vicraa (right inquiry): The yogi has pondered over what he or she has read and heard, and has realized it in his or her life.
Tanumnasa (attenuation or thinning out of mental activities): The mind abandons the many, and remains fixed on the One.
Sattvpatti (attainment of sattva, "reality"): The Yogi, at this stage, is called Brahmavid ("knower of Brahman"). In the previous four stages, the yogi is subject to sacita, Prrabdha and gam forms of karma. He or she has been practicing Samprajta Samdhi (contemplation), in which the consciousness of duality still exists.
Asasakti (unaffected by anything): The yogi (now called Brahmavidvara) performs his or her necessary duties, without a sense of involvement.
Padrtha abhvana (sees Brahm ...more
Answered by rajan, 08 Apr '13 07:30 am

 
  
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4.

This scripture provides several understandings, scientific ideas, philosophies, and explains about consciousness, creation of the world, the multiple universes in this world, our perception of world, dissolution of the world and the liberation of this soul, the non-dual approach to this creation.

Just as the blue sky is an optical illusion this entire world and the creation is but such an optical illusion. When the illusion ends in the mind, the world and its miseries too end. The self is the seer of all, the self is the perceiver of all and the self is the experiencer of all. And that self is only one.

There is no two, there is no subject, seer and the object. It is all one.

Another oft repeated verse in the text is that of Kakathaliya (coincidence). The story of how a crow alights on a palm tree and that very moment the ripe palm fruit falls on the ground. The two events are apparently related, yet the crow never intended the palm fruit to fall nor did the palm fruit fall b ...more
Answered by vedprakash sharma, 07 Apr '13 11:57 pm

 
  
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5.

The Yoga Vasishta sums up the spiritual process in terms of the Seven Bhoomikas:
1. Subecha. Longing for the Truth
The yogi or sadhaka rightly distinguishes between permanent and impermanent; cultivates dislike for worldly pleasures; acquires mastery over organs, physical and mental; and feels a deep yearning to be free from Samsara.
2. Vicharana. Right inquiry
The yogi has pondered over what her/she has read and heard and has realized it in his/her life.
3. Tanumanasa. Attenuation or thinning out of mental activities.
The mind abandons the many and remains fixed on the ONE.
4. Sattvapati. Attainment of Sattva
The Yogi at this stage is called Brahmavid or Knower of Brahman.
In the above 4 stages, the yogi is subject to Sanchita, Prabrabdha and Agami Karmas. He/she has been practicing Samprajnata Samadhi or contemplation in which consciousness of duality still exists. ...more
Answered by Rocking Raaj, 07 Apr '13 06:42 pm

 
  
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