Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

Summer this year so far is much more severe than earlier years. Is the feared global warming something to do with it?

Asked by Good Citizen, 22 Mar '10 12:24 pm
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (5)

1.

Yes dear, the Exeter based research team suggest that natural shifts in climate will counteract the effects of human activity & greenhouse gas emissions but after that the temperatures will rise more abruptly. Over the decade, the overall global average temperature is expected to increase by 0.3C & after 2010 each year has at least a 50% chance of exceeding the global temperature record currently set by 1998. After 2014 the chances of breaking the record rise even further.
This model follows one released by the National Centre for Atmospheric Research in Colorado focusing on the polar ice caps, which suggested that after 2025 a positive feedback loop could kick in as Arctic ice continued to melt: As the ice retreats, the ocean transports more heat to the Arctic & the open water absorbs more sunlight, further accelerating the rate of global warming & leading to the loss of more ice. Scientific opinion is moving away from the model of steady incremental increases in temperature & now le ...more
Answered by dharamender nebhnani, 22 Mar '10 04:51 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
 
2.

Yes ,according to Professor Chris Folland, of the Met Office Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, "We are likely to see more global warming than we have seen in the past few years, which have been rather cool. In fact, we are already seeing it."
Since the Pacific is a heat reservoir that drives wind patterns around the world, the change in its temperature alters global weather. An El Nino is defined by ocean surface temperatures rising by more than 0.5 degrees Celsius above the average. This El Nino is well beyond that, according to the Climate Prediction Center of the US National Weather Service. "Sea surface temperatures remain +0.5 to +1.5 above average across much of the equatorial Pacific Ocean," the centre reported last week. Observations and dynamical model forecasts indicate El Nino conditions will continue to intensify and are expected to last through the northern hemisphere winter of 2009-10. . Yes, from the above it is obvious Drought has to be faced in 2010
Answered by venkatesaldevarajan, 22 Mar '10 12:35 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

Yes exactly
Answered by rajnikant raiyarela, 22 Mar '10 05:41 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

Global warming started since the inception of earth, it's only that now it has reached a point that is attracting attention.
Answered by sandeep kumar srivastava, 22 Mar '10 12:30 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
5.

When nothing else to explain, blame global warming
Answered by dhanendra kumar jain, 22 Mar '10 12:24 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining

Related Answer

Q.
A

According to Professor Chris Folland, of the Met Office Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, "We are likely to see more global warming t..more