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Q.

How were the Khao Luang mountains formed?

Tags: food, travel, education
Asked by jameel ahmed, 05 Mar '10 09:02 am
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Answers (2)

 
1.

Lord of the streams; a great river; an ancient forest: all are titles which alternately describe the wonders of Khao Luang National Park, one of the world's most important reserves of various living organisms. Here, the land is high and has formed over centuries into multileveled peaks. Khao Luang, at 1,835 metres above sea level, is the highest peak in the South of Thailand and one of the most picturesque. Curved with deep plains, lush valleys, and tiny streams flowing through forests of rubber, Malabar ironwood, and yang rad (local rubber), Khao Luang is home to rare flora species, such as bang-chang fern (the most ancient fern in the world). Others include raya yok, lam tor noi, and konta singhto (rare flora species). The park also shelters over 327 species of wildlife, including some 157 species of tropical birds alone; all of which are near extinction. Apart from its share of tourists, the park also attracts surveyors, tropical botanists, and wildlife researchers year after year.
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Answered by mohd yousuf, 08 Mar '10 06:26 pm

 
  
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2.

Extremely intense rainfall of November 1988 in Southern Thailand triggered the worst natural disaster of the country. Widespread slope failures took place in the mountainous and hilly areas in the region that was previously considered to have low risk of landslides. Most slope failures occurred in the vicinity of the steep granitic Khao Luang Mountains where several villages along their rims were almost wiped out by catastrophic debris flows. This paper summarizes findings of a post-event study to determine the characteristics of the slope failures and their relation to geological setting, weathering characteristics, slope gradient, land use practice (vegetation cover) and rainfall intensity. Engineering characteristics of the weathered granite which was the predominant medium involved in the slope failures was also studied.
Answered by PERIL, 08 Mar '10 08:28 am

 
  
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