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Q.

Why the sky looks blue...?

Tags: science, environment, sky looks
Asked by jafar, 08 Mar '13 09:46 pm
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Answers (4)

 
1.

Tyndall and Rayleigh thought that the blue colour of the sky must be due to small particles of dust and droplets of water vapour in the atmosphere. Even today, people sometimes incorrectly say that this is the case. Later scientists realised that if this were true, there would be more variation of sky colour with humidity or haze conditions than was actually observed, so they supposed correctly that the molecules of oxygen and nitrogen in the air are sufficient to account for the scattering. The case was finally settled by Einstein in 1911, who calculated the detailed formula for the scattering of light from molecules; and this was found to be in agreement with experiment. He was even able to use the calculation as a further verification of Avogadro's number when compared with observation. The molecules are able to scatter light because the electromagnetic field of the light waves induces electric dipole moments in the molecules.
Answered by jameel ahmed, 08 Mar '13 09:48 pm

 
  
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2.

The blue colour of sky is due to the scattering of light by small particles of the atmosphere (air molecules) when the light is incident on particles whose size is smaller than the wavelength of light, it is scattered. According to Rayleigh law, the intensity of scattered light is inversely proportional to the fourth power of wavelength. As the wavelength of blue colour is smallest and that of red light is longest, the blue light is scattered most and the red light is scattered least. The scattered blue light reaching the eye gives the appearance of a blue sky. The sky will appear black in the absence of earths atmosphere because no scattering of any colour takes place in that case. While flying in an aeroplane one can observe the sky to be black at high altitudes.
Answered by anil garg, 17 Apr '13 06:47 pm

 
  
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3.

Basically sky is not blue but it appears blue when sun light scatter through atmospheric gas due to effect called Rayleigh effect. The scattering effect of the light is proportional to fourth power of the wavelength and the wave length if blue colour makes it more efficient in getting scattered than other visible colours.
Answered by MAdhavan Avadhany, 08 Mar '13 10:01 pm

 
  
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4.

Tum insaan q lagte ho?
Answered by jiya sabnani, 08 Mar '13 09:54 pm

 
  
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