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Q.

Why people awe scientists and science?

Tags: careers, education, science
Asked by Prakash Jawdekar, 07 Feb '13 10:31 pm
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Answers (6)

 
1.

Scientists make new inventions , science gives proof with facts and they work hard for it. that is why.
Answered by tanuja, 08 Feb '13 07:05 pm

 
  
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2.

Their fear is baseless.
Answered by amitava duttamajumdar, 07 Feb '13 10:35 pm

 
  
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3.

Because they frequently fail in those papers and can never reach to the level of those people.))=
Answered by Susma Swaraj, 07 Feb '13 10:34 pm

 
  
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4.

They expound truths and facts
Answered by mrs mary joseph, 08 Feb '13 03:48 pm

 
  
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5.

No one does..
Answered by Anurag Sharma, 07 Feb '13 11:09 pm

 
  
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6.

For many people, science invites awe and religion invites insight. When awe and insight engage, science-and-religion happens.
Awe is an important part of the experience of science one could almost say its a universal. When a scientist feels awe it is usually in response to something complex, precise, ordered, powerful or beautiful. There is an element of unexpectedness and delight, maybe even respect, fear or reverence. Awe always involves the need for some sort of mental adjustment or accommodation: we need to make room in our internal map of the world for this new and amazing experience. The physicist Werner Heisenberg vividly described this process of taking on board a startling new concept when he wrote of his discovery of atomic energy levels:

In the first moment I was deeply frightened. I had the feeling that, through the surface of atomic phenomena, I was looking at a deeply lying bottom of remarkable internal beauty. I felt almost giddy at the thought that I had now to ...more
Source: partly google search
Answered by anil garg, 07 Feb '13 11:02 pm

 
  
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