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Q.

Why mercury does not stick on glass ??

Tags: science
Asked by SriniVenkat, 01 Nov '10 06:00 pm
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Answers (6)

1.

Dont know fir bhi ba dedo
Answered by MITALI DESHPANDE, 01 Nov '10 06:01 pm

 
  
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2.

Mercury is a liquid Metal , therefore shows metallic properties and because of higher surface tension mercury do not stick to the walls of thermometer or do not stick to the glass.The surface tension of mercury is about 480 dyne/cm,
Answered by kartikay sharma, 01 Nov '10 06:19 pm

 
  
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3.

Inertness of Mercury, Normally Mercury react with glass or may be viscosity of Mercury
Answered by thyagarajan mahadevan, 01 Nov '10 06:01 pm

 
  
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4.

Sticking is not the feature of mercury or any metal.
Regards
Unconscious - The Real Life
Answered by Sushil Sharma, 02 Nov '10 02:53 pm

 
  
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5.

The reason is that the viscosity of Mercury is low 0.159*10^-2 (kg/ms).
(for water = 0.105*10^-2 (kg/ms))
You can view more intuitively if you know for example the Glicerine viscosity
(139.3 * 10^-2 ( kg/ms), three order of magnitude higher).
Answered by jakir hussain, 01 Nov '10 06:40 pm

 
  
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6.

Mercury is the only metal that, at room temperature, remains a liquid. It does not become a solid until it gets down to -38.72 degrees centigrade. This means that it can be frozen with dry ice. Yet it is still a brittle metal, even in its solid state. This is because Mercury does not like to bond with itself, and is highly resistant to bonding with other elements.
Answered by gkr, 01 Nov '10 06:22 pm

 
  
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