Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

Why is Greenland called Greenland, when it's white and covered with ice?

Tags: travel, greenland
Asked by Suraj, 14 Sep '13 09:49 pm
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering     Map Successfully AddedAdd Map
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (5)

 
1.

Bcz FINLAND is FINLAND without FINS
HOLLAND is HOLLAND without any Hole
NEW ZEALAND is NEW ZEALAND with everything old......
NETHERLAND is NETHERLAND with nothing negative......
and finally POLAND is POLAND without a pole......
Answered by Stupidcommonman, 14 Sep '13 10:14 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

The name Greenland comes from the early Scandinavian settlers
Answered by Quest, 14 Sep '13 10:17 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

Itz always like that, ppl. hv the name which they aspire or do n't hv than what they are or what they hv.
Answered by MAdhavan Avadhany, 14 Sep '13 10:05 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

The name Greenland comes from the early Scandinavian settlers. In the Icelandic sagas, it is said that Norwegian-born Erik the Red was exiled from Iceland for murder. He, along with his extended family and thralls, set out in ships to find a land rumored to lie to the northwest. After settling there, he named the land Greenland, supposedly in the hope that the pleasant name would attract settlers. Greenland was also called Grunt land and Engronelant (or Engroneland) on early maps. Whether green is an erroneous transcription of grunt , which refers to shallow bays, or vice versa, is not known. The southern portion of Greenland (not covered by glaciers) is relatively green in the summer.
Source: Naveen Kumar
Answered by naveen kumar, 14 Sep '13 09:53 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
5.

The name Greenland comes from the early Scandinavian settlers. In the Icelandic sagas, it is said that Norwegian-born Erik the Red was exiled from Iceland for murder. He, along with his extended family and thralls, set out in ships to find a land rumored to lie to the northwest. After settling there, he named the land Greenland, supposedly in the hope that the pleasant name would attract settlers. Greenland was also called Grunt land and Engronelant (or Engroneland) on early maps. Whether green is an erroneous transcription of grunt , which refers to shallow bays, or vice versa, is not known. The southern portion of Greenland (not covered by glaciers) is relatively green in the summer.
Source: Internet
Answered by Lucky, 14 Sep '13 09:52 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining