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Q.

Why doesn't a candle burn?

Tags: science, entertainment, environment
Asked by John, 24 Nov '12 11:49 am
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Answers (4)

1.

The activation energy for the combustion reaction that takes place when the candle burns is too great for the reaction to begin at room temperature without the input of energy (such as by lighting it with a match). However, once the reaction has been started, it produces enough energy to sustain itself. This is why the candle continues to burn.
Answered by iqbal seth, 24 Nov '12 12:07 pm

 
  
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2.

It's actually really hard to ignite most solids and liquids, because so little is exposed to the air.The only molecules that burn are the ones that evaporate and mix with the air. There are still fewer in a candle, where most of the wax molecules are stuck to the other wax molecules.

What you need is a way for the wax molecules to liquefy and spread over more surface area, so they can mix with the air and be ignited. That's what the wick is for. The flame melts the wax at the tip of the candle, then draws it up via capillary
Answered by RACHANAexposer, 24 Nov '12 12:04 pm

 
  
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3.

The activation energy for the combustion reaction that takes place when the candle burns is too great for the reaction to begin at room temperature without the input of energy (such as by lighting it with a match). However, once the reaction has been started, it produces enough energy to sustain itself. This is why the candle continues to burn.
Answered by Quest, 24 Nov '12 12:03 pm

 
  
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4.

The activation energy for the combustion reaction that takes place when the candle burns is too great for the reaction to begin at room temperature without the input of energy (such as by lighting it with a match). However, once the reaction has been started, it produces enough energy to sustain itself. This is why the candle continues to burn.
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 24 Nov '12 11:57 am

 
  
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