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Q.

Why does soda fizz more with ice added?

Tags: food, science, news & events
Asked by shrishti, 18 Feb '13 04:21 pm
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Answers (4)

 
1.

If you leave the soda out all day, it will go flat. So we know that the equilibrium condition is for all the carbonation (dissolved carbon dioxide gas) to escape. But it doesn't all escape instantly, or the bottle would explode as soon as you open it! The fizzing is rate-limited by lack of activation energy for the bubbles to form. In short, very few of the dissolved gas molecules are moving fast enough to "bust out" from the liquid to form a bubble. Something has to help the CO2 fizz up.
Answered by Quest, 18 Feb '13 09:09 pm

 
  
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2.

If you leave the soda out all day, it will go flat. So we know that the equilibrium condition is for all the carbonation (dissolved carbon dioxide gas) to escape. But it doesn't all escape instantly, or the bottle would explode as soon as you open it! The fizzing is rate-limited by lack of activation energy for the bubbles to form. In short, very few of the dissolved gas molecules are moving fast enough to "bust out" from the liquid to form a bubble. Something has to help the CO2 fizz up.
Answered by chennai mail, 26 Feb '13 03:11 pm

 
  
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3.

If you leave the soda out all day, it will go flat. So we know that the equilibrium condition is for all the carbonation (dissolved carbon dioxide gas) to escape. But it doesn't all escape instantly, or the bottle would explode as soon as you open it! The fizzing is rate-limited by lack of activation energy for the bubbles to form. In short, very few of the dissolved gas molecules are moving fast enough to "bust out" from the liquid to form a bubble. Something has to help the CO2 fizz up.
Answered by radha sharma, 22 Feb '13 09:45 am

 
  
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4.

If you leave the soda out all day, it will go flat. So we know that the equilibrium condition is for all the carbonation (dissolved carbon dioxide gas) to escape. But it doesn't all escape instantly, or the bottle would explode as soon as you open it! The fizzing is rate-limited by lack of activation energy for the bubbles to form. In short, very few of the dissolved gas molecules are moving fast enough to "bust out" from the liquid to form a bubble. Something has to help the CO2 fizz up.

Under undisturbed conditions the gas only diffuses out very slowly. Notice that it takes hours and hours for soda to go flat. There are two easy ways to speed up the decarbonation: reduce the activation energy required for the gas to escape, or just give it more energy. Adding ice does the former: the rough surface of the ice creates "nucleation sites" where bubbles are able to form easily
Source: google search
Answered by Lucky, 18 Feb '13 04:27 pm

 
  
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