Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

Why does a white cricket ball swing more than a red ball does?

Tags: sports, science, entertainment
Asked by Piaa, 26 Apr '13 10:38 am
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (5)

 
1.

The Dukes white ball manufacturing process is not quite the same as that for the conventional red ball. With the conventional red ball, the leather is dyed red, greased and polished with a shellac topcoat. This final polish disappears very quickly during play and it is the grease in the leather that produces the shine when polished by the bowler. The finish applied to the white ball is slightly different. The leather is sprayed with a polyurethane white paint-like fluid and then heat-treated so that it bonds to the leather like a hard skin. As a final treatment, one coat of clear polyurethane-based topcoat is applied to further protect the white surface so that it does not get dirty easily. This extra coating ends up affecting the ball aerodynamics by making the surface smoother..
Answered by aflatoon, 26 Apr '13 10:46 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (2)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

Lighter
Answered by FekuSingh, 28 Apr '13 09:57 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

Because of the seam
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 27 Apr '13 03:21 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

All cricket balls are made from cork and latex rubber on the inside with leather on the outside. On the white ball there is a polyurethane coating added to stop the ball getting dirty.

When the coating is intact, it makes the ball smoother.

Some bowlers found that, because of this, they could not control a new white ball as much as they would a red one. South African paceman Allan Donald twigged to this and consequently did not open the bowling when a white ball was being used.
Answered by Astaroth, 26 Apr '13 10:46 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
5.

It does not
Answered by rajan, 26 Apr '13 10:39 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining