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Q.

Why do we call MERRY CHRISTMAS and not HAPPY CHRISTMAS ...... ???

Tags: books, entertainment, merry christmas
Asked by Manoj Joshi, 25 Dec '12 09:39 am
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Answers (5)

 
1.

Both carry the same meaning! One can say either of the two. I have seen written on greeting cards both the words. How ever 'merry' is more an American way of wishing as they don't like to do things that the British do! And 'happy' is the word used mostly by the British.
Answered by QueSera Sera, 25 Dec '12 09:50 am

 
  
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2.

The greetings and farewells "Merry Christmas" and "Happy Christmas" are traditionally used in North America, the United Kingdom, and Ireland beginning a few weeks prior to the Christmas holiday on December 25 of every year. "Merry" dominates in the United States; "happy" in the United Kingdom and Ireland
Answered by jameel ahmed, 25 Dec '12 09:45 am

 
  
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3.

If you mean indians by the word we, we are just copying the western countries without even knowing the reason for calling it merry or happy
Answered by iqbal seth, 25 Dec '12 09:55 am

 
  
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4.

Americans say: "Merry Christmas" and people from England say: "Happy Christmas".

"Merrie England. England of the Anglo-Saxon period and the Middle Ages was not a very happy place to be, let alone 'merrie.' So why this phrase indicating revelry and joyous spirits, as if England were one perpetual Christmastime? The answer is that the word 'merrie' originally meant merely 'pleasing and delightful,' not bubbling over with festive spirits, as it does today. The same earlier meaning is found in the famous expression, 'the merry month of May.'"

My only other Merry Christmas fact, recycled from an earlier inquiry: "The tradition of sending Christmas cards originated in the mid-1800's when a few people began to design handmade cards to send to family and friends. A man named John Calcott Horsely is credited as being the first to actually print Christmas cards. The card depicted a family enjoying the holiday, with scenes of people performing acts of charity.
Answered by Rocking Raaj, 25 Dec '12 09:48 am

 
  
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5.

Good questions ....no idea
Answered by Admn, 25 Dec '12 09:42 am

 
  
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