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Q.

Why do humans laugh when tickled?

Tags: relationships, environment, religion & spirituality
Asked by Iqbal Seth, 21 Sep '13 06:18 pm
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Answers (8)

 
1.

Most species respond to tickling or other light touches by withdrawing to avoid the attack on the vulnerable area. It appears that we learn to laugh at tickling as children only when we perceive the tickling as a mock attack that is actually an act of personal closeness. Interestingly, recent research by the cognitive neuroscientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore has shown that we cant tickle ourselves, no matter how hard we try.
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 21 Sep '13 06:21 pm

 
  
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2.

The experience that it creates in our body is a funny one, is it not so?
Is it not as simple as that?
Answered by Shunmugham, 22 Sep '13 08:29 am

 
  
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3.

Nerves. We have wonderful nerves all over our bodies and in some places such as our arms they can be a bit more sensitive causing us to laugh from that tingling sensation when tickled.

Why we laugh or giggle is pure reaction though some become angry because they do not like the feeling of being tickled...they don't get the same "tickle" feeling from their sensitive nerves rather annoyed like "rubbing a cat the wrong way".
Answered by jafar, 22 Sep '13 12:39 am

 
  
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4.

The reason you squirm is because your body is trying to escape from whatever is tickling it, not knowing whether or not it's going to come to any harm. As for the laughing/giggling, you may not know this, but your nerves that feel the sensation of tickling are also your nerves that feel the sensation of pain (this next part may be a little confusing to explain, so here goes). Since soft touches don't hurt you but they still tickle, your body & nerves become confused & can't tell whether or not you are in any real danger, even if you consciously know you're only in a playful tickle-fight.
Answered by vedprakash sharma, 21 Sep '13 11:54 pm

 
  
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5.

Not all
Answered by Quest, 21 Sep '13 08:53 pm

 
  
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6.

That is a sudden sensation to which mind reacts abruptly and the laughter bursts.
Answered by Om Shrivastava, 21 Sep '13 06:40 pm

 
  
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7.

Tickling[1] is the act of touching a part of the body so as to cause involuntary twitching movements and/or laughter. The word About this sound "tickle" (helpinfo) evolved from the Middle English tikelen, perhaps frequentative of ticken, to touch lightly.[1] The idiom tickled pink means to be pleased or delighted.[2]
In 1897, psychologists G. Stanley Hall and Arthur Allin described a "tickle" as two different types of phenomena.[3] One type is caused by very light movement across the skin. This type of tickle, called a knismesis, generally does not produce laughter and is sometimes accompanied by an itching sensation. The question as to why a person could not tickle him/herself was raised by the Greek philosopher, Aristotle.[4]
Francis Bacon and Charles Darwin believe that humorous laughter requires a "light" frame of mind. But they differed on ticklish laughter: Darwin thought that the same light state of mind was required, whereas Bacon said no: When tickled, noted Bacon, "men even ...more
Source: My intelligent mind!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Answered by preetibarna panda, 21 Sep '13 06:24 pm

 
  
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