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Q.

Why do British lawyers, barristers and judges wear wigs?

Tags: law & legal, judges wear, british lawyers
Asked by Farhaan, 05 Mar 04:54 pm
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Answers (7)

1.

The tradition of wearing wigs started towards the early sixteenth century when Henry VI took over England ....and since then the tradition has been adopted in the English courts till now.....
Answered by Pradipta pati, 05 Mar 05:46 pm

 
  
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2.

Tradition, man, tradition
Answered by iqbal seth, 05 Mar 05:22 pm

 
  
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3.

Because they were simply following the fashion of the day which was a sign of wealth and status. Initially, judges thought the wigs were coxcombical; hence, did not allow young advocates to plead while wearing them.
Answered by Stone Heart, 05 Mar 05:10 pm

 
  
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4.

By 1680 most judges and barristers wore wigs in court; they were simply following the fashion of the day. At that time they signified wealth and status.
Initially, judges thought the wigs were coxcombical (flashy as worn by dandy) and so didnt allow young advocates to plead in them. But the wigs gradually became more accepted and stuck as a mode of court dress.
Answered by GOPI KUMAR, 05 Mar 05:04 pm

 
  
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5.

It is mostly in name of maintaining age old tradions.

There is story behind it. The balding Louis the Fourteen adopted the wig out of vanity. When King Charles Two returned from the French court, the trend spread among the wealthy of England. By Sixteen hundred sixty, judges and the House of Lords adopted the fashion of the day.

A bench of judges, or Lords, dressed uniformly, from wig to toe, implies a united front representing the Crown's interest, rather than the individual interests of its members. Robes and wigs also hide details of clothing that potentially distract attention in a court proceeding.
Answered by Lucky, 05 Mar 04:58 pm

 
  
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6.

Taaki lag sake ke wo waqeel ya judge hain
Answered by gulab khan, 05 Mar 04:56 pm

 
  
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7.

Yup. But only in bed.
Answered by Mickey, 05 Mar 08:41 pm

 
  
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