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Q.

Why do all planets and moons spin?

Tags: moons spin
Asked by whizkid, 21 Sep '13 06:35 pm
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Answers (7)

 
1.

The reason is tied to the origins of the Solar System as a primordial Sun surrounded by initially randomly swirling clouds of dust and gas. Pulled towards the Sun by gravity, these clouds became denser, with internal collisions leading to a preferred direction of motion. Like water spiralling round a plughole, the collapsing clouds swirled in this direction at an ever-faster rate, eventually becoming dense enough to collapse under their own gravity and form spinning planets and moons. The one exception is Saturns moon Hyperion, which seems to have undergone a very violent impact, turning it into a potato-shaped rock that tumbles chaotically through space. RM
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 21 Sep '13 06:38 pm

 
  
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2.

Because it both rotates and revolves and hence it appears to be spinning
Answered by rajnikant raiyarela, 21 Sep '13 07:01 pm

 
  
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3.

The whole universe spins ; so do all stars, planets and the galaxies do.
Answered by Om Shrivastava, 21 Sep '13 06:44 pm

 
  
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4.

There will be no planets if there was no initial angular momentum in the primordial solar nebula. If a nebula with absolutely no rotation collapses, then there will only be a central non-rotating star and there will not be any planets. Planets form out of a protostellar disk, which itself forms only because of the initial angular momentum of the cloud. The dynamics of a rotating body is of course controlled by forces like gravity. Kepler's laws are a direct consequence of gravity.
Answered by anil garg, 24 Sep '13 02:16 pm

 
  
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5.

Because it both rotates and revolves and hence it appears to be spinning
Answered by aflatoon, 23 Sep '13 12:23 pm

 
  
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6.

Because it both rotates and revolves and hence it appears to be spinning
Answered by Quest, 21 Sep '13 08:47 pm

 
  
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7.

They have to spin or ese they fal. See a spinning top.like that.
Answered by victor, 21 Sep '13 07:05 pm

 
  
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