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Q.

Was Guru Nanak Sahab more of a Muslim than other faith ?

Tags: muslim, news & events, politics & government
Asked by harish chandra, 23 Nov '11 12:15 pm
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Answers (7)

1.

Sikhism as we know it today is the result of the teachings of the ten Gurus, the first of which was Guru Nanak (1469-1539) and the tenth and last of which was Guru Gobind Singh (1666-1708).

Guru Nanak spread a simple message: "We are all one, created by the One Creator of all Creation." There is no definitive biography of Guru Nanak, though there have been many attempts to write the story of his life by his devotees after his death.

According to Dr. Hari Ram Gupta, author of A Life-Sketch of Guru Nanak, Nanak started his mission at a time when both Hinduism and Islam as practiced in the Indian Subcontinent had become distorted and degraded. The caste system was at its worst, and all kinds of corruption had become rampant in society. Men of vision were worried, and they attacked the rot that had set in the society. Rather than address the socio-political problems, the reformers of the day tried to initiate a spiritual movement that would turn people towards God. They believed th ...more
Answered by KHALIDA PATEL, 23 Nov '11 12:25 pm

 
  
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2.

Many Hindus and Muslims consider their religion superior but Guru Nanak Dev Ji instructed to focus on meditation of God instead of glorifying a religion. Bhai Gurdas narrates one instance when Hindus and Muslims asked Guru Nanak about who was greater among them. "Priest from both Hinduism and Islam got together and began discussing religion. A great fantasy has been created and no one could understand its mystery. They asked Guru Nanak to open and search in his scripture whether Hindu is greater or the Muslim. Guru replied that without good deeds both will have to weep and wail. Only by being a Hindu or a Muslim one cannot get accepted in the kingdom of God. As the color of safflower is impermanent and is washed away in water, likewise the colors of religiosity are also temporary" (The Vaars of Bhai Gurdas Ji, 1). Guru Nanak Dev Ji himself said, "A Hindu comes to the house of a Hindu. By reading the scriptures, he puts on the sacred thread. Even after wearing the thread, but does evil ...more
Answered by jameel ahmed, 23 Nov '11 12:17 pm

 
  
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3.

Jee nahin
Answered by iqbal seth, 23 Nov '11 12:16 pm

 
  
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4.

Section onetwoone onetwofoura IPC. Jee nahin
Answered by pichku tube, 26 Oct 09:20 am

 
  
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5.

Not True..
Answered by klm, 26 Nov '11 04:02 pm

 
  
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6.

No
he was a true disciple of his faith
Answered by anil garg, 24 Nov '11 06:48 pm

 
  
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7.

He probably was against the people using "Hinduism" or "Islam" as the brand to associate with.
So the discussion on these lines may be futile.
Answered by Kuldeep S, 23 Nov '11 12:27 pm

 
  
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