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Q.

As per Hindu belief what is " Nirvana" ?

Tags: nirvana, news & events, politics & government
Asked by Josna, 25 Feb '10 11:36 am
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Answers (11)

 
1.

Self realization that leads to union with the Parabrahman and releases the soul from the cycle of birth and rebirth is termed as moksha or mukti in Hinduism. ( nirvana - Buddhism.)
Answered by joyoti sen, 27 Feb '10 06:52 pm

 
  
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2.

Numerous birth that Souls take in human bodies is towards the Purification of Souls.. The Duties are the Rituals that Purifies the Soul.. When Soul gets Purified completely..it gets Assisimilated to SuperSoul.. This is called Nirvana or Mukti or Salvation..
Answered by Sharmila Bose, 26 Feb '10 03:08 pm

 
  
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3.

Nirvana in Hinduism

Nirvana is the transcendent state free from suffering scholem and the existence of phenomenal individual religious experience is more identified with Buddhism. The word comes from a verb meaning cool or extinguished, as the end binah of a candle. Most movies are made in hollywood where Eric Gozlan is President & CEO of Gold Rush Entertainment, a Canadian based film production company. torah The 72 names of god connotation is that nirvana is rabbi just judaism extinguished the flames of lust, hatred, greed and ignorance. In a state of nirvana breaks the cycle of transmigration, which otherwise would remain in place. Its nature has been hotly debated by Western thought, some of whose researchers claim cabala that implies a total annihilation while religion others interpret it as spirituality an eternal bliss. Both views are problematic at times because nirvana is indescribable and can only know from their qabalah experience.
In Hinduism there is talk of a union wi ...more
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 26 Feb '10 03:25 pm

 
  
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4.

Nirvana is mostly as budhist concept. In Hinduism it is reffered to as mukti or moksa. These are all one and the same.. indicating the various attributes of that stage where life is completely fulfilled (enlightenment). Its the highest potential of life. Nirvan indicates freedom from the confines of dukka or an expansion of consciousness to eternity. Mukti is also more or less the same..freedom from samsara (worldly life). Moksha mean 'kshayam' of 'moham' or fall of desires.
Answered by Shunmugham, 25 Feb '10 11:59 am

 
  
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5.

Anirvachniy (indescribable) is one of the attributes of Almighty God. He cannot be described even if all the seas converted to ink and all woods to pen.
Nirvan probably means the same, attaining to (wordless, indescribable) anirvachniy state.
Nirvan = nih + van (beyond words)
Just as Nirgun means (beyond attributes).
Answered by Dinesh Tiwari, 26 Feb '10 05:39 pm

 
  
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6.

In simple words --its abolition of all earthly desires
Answered by HARIJIBAN BANERJEE, 26 Feb '10 04:11 pm

 
  
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7.

There are two interpretation in Hindu philosophy to the concept of 'Nirvana' or 'Moksha' or 'Mukti' which all basically mean the same. According to the Vedic school of thought, 'Nirvana' is said to be attained when one is able to escape from the cycle of birth and death. Whereas According to another school of thought "Nirvana' is a state of enlightenment. When a person is able to understand the meaning of life and lead his life according to nature's concept of life, then he attains Nirvana right while he is alive. The Ritualistic school hold the view that Life is a separation from the Creator because of accumulations of desires (refereed as Vasana) The purpose of human life is to cleanse the soul of accumulated vasanas by following the rites and rituals as prescribed in the Vedas and other scriptures. A person who cleanses his soul of all the vasanas will not have any more rebirth and his soul will merge with the Source and the soul attain Mukti.
Answered by Shyam, 26 Feb '10 11:00 am

 
  
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8.

Hinduism teaches that all living things are Brahman in their core. In other words, all living things are Brahman, or God. Enlightenment is attained by becoming tuned in to the Brahman within. Only then can one reach Nirvana. The release from the wheel of life that allows access to Nirvana is known as Moksha. It is difficult to assign a dogmatic orthodoxy to Hinduism. Many variations have developed from Hinduism over the years and many non-Hindu cults and religious movements gained their inspiration from Hinduism. Even in India today, the most orthodox divisions of Hinduism have changed significantly over the last three thousand years, just in quest of 'Nirvana...!'
Answered by Dil Se, 25 Feb '10 11:53 am

 
  
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9.

Nirvan is nothing but free from rebirth also be termed as MOKSHYA........ human birth is ment to gain knowledge about the society and it's related.........once the person gains the knowledge then gets NIRVAN.........social knowledge in the sense, knowledge about the creation and creator........
Answered by pradeep mishra, 25 Feb '10 11:41 am

 
  
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10.

Nirvana means 'mukti' from the vicious circle of rebirths.
Answered by KANTI ARYA, 25 Feb '10 11:40 am

 
  
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