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Q.

What is the cause of the brain cell death after a stroke?

Tags: health, science, technology
Asked by Josna, 23 Nov '09 05:11 pm
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Answers (5)

 
1.

Following a stroke, many brain cells continue to die even after blood flow has been restored. Researchers have long known this is due to a complicated cascade of cellular messages that lead to the "self-destruction" and death of brain cells.

The team of Brain Research Centre scientists discovered that, in animal models, the over-activation of NMDA receptors -- special receptors on the surface of brain cells -- activates another protein, called SREBP-1, which subsequently causes cell death. SREBP-1 is found naturally in cells throughout the body and is involved with cholesterol and other fat production.

NMDA receptors control the movement of calcium in and out of brain cells, which is necessary for normal brain function. However, following a stroke, levels of glutamate -- the most abundant chemical messenger in the brain -- rise rapidly in cells, leading to over-activation of NMDA receptors, an excess of calcium entering cells, and the onset of cell death.

The researchers found ...more
Answered by Pardeep kapoor, 23 Nov '09 05:16 pm

 
  
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2.

Following a stroke, many brain cells continue to die even after blood flow has been restored. Researchers have long known this is due to a complicated cascade of cellular messages that lead to the "self-destruction" and death of brain cells.
The team of Brain Research Centre scientists discovered that, in animal models, the over-activation of NMDA receptors -- special receptors on the surface of brain cells -- activates another protein, called SREBP-1, which subsequently causes cell death. SREBP-1 is found naturally in cells throughout the body and is involved with cholesterol and other fat production.
NMDA receptors control the movement of calcium in and out of brain cells, which is necessary for normal brain function. However, following a stroke, levels of glutamate -- the most abundant chemical messenger in the brain -- rise rapidly in cells, leading to over-activation of NMDA receptors, an excess of calcium entering cells, and the onset of cell death.
The researchers found that ...more
Answered by thangiah kannan, 23 Nov '09 05:36 pm

 
  
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3.

Formation of blood clot
Answered by ANURADHA PATHAKJ, 23 Nov '09 05:27 pm

 
  
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4.

NMDA receptors control the movement of calcium in and out of brain cells, which is necessary for normal brain function. However, following a stroke, levels of glutamate -- the most abundant chemical messenger in the brain -- rise rapidly in cells, leading to over-activation of NMDA receptors, an excess of calcium entering cells, and the onset of cell death.
Answered by prashant prashar, 23 Nov '09 05:18 pm

 
  
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5.

Formation of puss
Answered by rajnikant raiyarela, 23 Nov '09 05:12 pm

 
  
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