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Q.

Effects of fairy tales on children...do you think it makes the child believe an illusion and become self-deluding as they grow up...?

Tags: child, illusion, effects of fairy tales on children
Asked by sumitha, 25 Nov '07 08:42 pm
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Answers (11)

 
1.

For generations, children have delighted in the enchanted world of fairy tales the timeless kingdom of giants and dwarfs, princes and princesses, fairies and witches. Fairy tales seem to be a favorite, intimate, indispensable companion of children. Why can they remain so popular among children for hundreds of years without being forgotten and lost? Fairy tales have a unique importance and impact on childrens development. They have significant effects on children, as well as adults, who are the main source of fairy tales for children. As adults are current members of the society and children are its future architects, fairy tales exert an influence on society as well. The effect of classic fairy tales on readers and society can be explored by studying their styles, characters and themes.
the effect of classic fairy tales on readers and society can be explored by studying their styles. One peculiar feature of their styles is their inevitable happy endings in which good is rewarded and ...more
Answered by Ashish jain, 25 Nov '07 09:43 pm

 
  
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2.

its depend on condition
Answered by rajendra, 25 Nov '07 08:42 pm

 
  
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3.

Bruno Bettelheim , the Austrian-born U.S. psychoanalyst. Said, Fairy tales unconsciously understand, and...offer examples of both temporary and permanent solutions to pressing difficulties. I believe him that fairy tales do not make the child believe an illusion and let him become self-deluding as they grow up

Answered by Jack Johnson, 26 Nov '07 08:01 am

 
  
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4.

No I don't think that. Today's children are much more aware and sophisticated than the children of 20 years ago. In certain societies they are way ahead of their parents. They may believe fairy tales for a while but other children will spoil their illusions soon enough.
Answered by Janis, 26 Nov '07 03:37 am

 
  
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5.

Yes Dear.
I was very much influeunced with Lee Fak's Phantom, Denkali, Guran & Diana :)
I tried to personify Phantom in my real life..
It was a terrible blunder....
Rgds / CR
Answered by Cocktail, 25 Nov '07 09:36 pm

 
  
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6.

Generally no. They are now-a-days intelligent than us.
Answered by krishnaswamy thattai renganathaiyengar, 25 Nov '07 08:51 pm

 
  
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7.

yes, still cindrella is in my mind, see how it influences. nw superman and spiderman conquers kids.
Answered by hitler, 25 Nov '07 08:42 pm

 
  
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8.

Fairy tales used for expanding a child's imagination should be encouraged. At the same time stories about reality should also be a part of their overall reading/development.

Once in a while even adults enjoy a good fiction or a movie such as the Harry Potter series, Lord of the Rings etc.
Answered by gurudev, 26 Nov '07 10:16 pm

 
  
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9.

Most human beings are either fans or fanatics. Courtesy the Internet here's a description of a fanatic/fan

Fanaticism is an emotion of being filled with excessive, uncritical zeal, particularly for an extreme religious or political cause, or with an obsessive enthusiasm for a pastime or hobby.

According to philosopher George Santayana, "Fanaticism consists in redoubling your effort when you have forgotten your aim According to Winston Churchill, "A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject".

The difference between a fan and a fanatic is that while both have an overwhelming liking or interest in a given subject, behaviour of a fanatic will be viewed as violating prevailing social norms, while that of a fan will not violate those norms (although is usually considered unusual

A fanatic differs from a crank in that the latter term is typically associated with a position or opinion which is so far from the norm as to appear ludicrous and/or prov ...more
Answered by gem mina, 26 Nov '07 05:34 am

 
  
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10.

ofcourse children have fantacies for certain age but after that they forget the stories and start dreaming about wordly things

deen ki daulat ki aur rutbe ki bat lab per hoi
to samjh lo ke baal ka masoom baalpan gaya
Answered by abdus sattarmerchant, 25 Nov '07 08:48 pm

 
  
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