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Q.

What is the Origin of "CURFEW"...??

Asked by rocky robust, 24 Aug '08 12:48 am
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Answers (6)

1.

It comes from the french phrase couvre feu, which means cover fire. when you covered the fire (in the fireplace/at home), there was all darkness and no one could see you and you couldn't see anything so you just jolly well stayed put inside your house. over a period of time the words got merged and it became "curfew".
Answered by nargis bhambi, 24 Aug '08 01:03 am

 
  
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2.

The word "curfew" comes from the French phrase "couvre feu" which means "cover the fire". It was used to describe the time of blowing out all lamps and candles. It was later adopted by the Medieval English language as "curfeu", which later became the modern "curfew"
Answered by Gaurav Malhotra, 24 Aug '08 01:01 am

 
  
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3.

Actually it has originated from the French word "couvre feu" which means cover the fire.
Answered by Ramchander kumar kushwaha, 24 Aug '08 12:52 am

 
  
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4.

Comes from an old French word that means "cover fire." In Europe during the Middle Ages, a curfew was a metal cone or shield that was used to put the hearth fire in the evening. Eventually, the word came to mean the end of the day's activities.
Answered by Rabindranath Sahu, 24 Aug '08 12:51 am

 
  
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5.

The word "curfew" comes from the French phrase "couvre feu" which means "cover the fire". It was used to describe the time of blowing out all lamps and candles. It was later adopted by the Medieval English language as "curfeu", which later became the modern "curfew"
Answered by Quest, 06 Oct '13 11:16 am

 
  
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6.

Few: less people. Cur: greek for dogs.....so more dogs and less people= curfew.
Answered by ramakant, 24 Aug '08 12:48 am

 
  
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