Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

What is fibre-saturation point?

Tags: relationships, education, science
Asked by Lucy Westfield, 24 Sep '09 05:49 pm
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (2)

 
1.

Fibre-saturation point is the maximum amount of water that can be taken up from the vapour phase at a given temperature by a unit weight of wood or cellulose. It is related to volumetric swelling and o. d. wood density as-
L = a(v)/a(o), where L is FSP, and a(v) and a(o) are volumetric swelling and o.d. wood density respectively.
If there is just enough water to saturate wood cell-wall and no liquid water is present in the cell-lumen, the wood is said to be at its Fibre-Saturation Point(FSP). Water is held on cell-wall and in between micro-fibrils at H-bonding site.
Answered by Bharat Biswas, 24 Sep '09 07:42 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

Fibre saturation point is a term used in wood mechanics and especially wood drying, to denote the point in the drying process at which only water bound in the cell walls remains - all other water, called free water, having been removed from the cell cavities. Further drying of the wood results in strengthening of the wood fibres, and is usually accompanied by shrinkage. Wood is normally dried to a point where it is in equilibrium with the atmospheric moisture content or relative humidity, and since this varies so does the equilibrium moisture content.
Answered by PARTHA PATHAK, 24 Sep '09 05:58 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining