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Q.

Which impotant human right is protected in article 21 of the constitution of india?

Tags: money, politics & government, law & legal
Asked by solanki mayur, 12 Mar '13 04:47 pm
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Answers (6)

1.

Article 21 states that no one maybe deprived of their life or liberty unless it is by due procedure of law.
Answered by anantharaman, 12 Mar '13 07:43 pm

 
  
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2.

Right to Life and Liberty. Article 21 states that no one maybe deprived of their life or liberty unless it is by due procedure of law. In the first 25 years or so, this Article was very narrowly interpreted by the Supreme Court to mean that no matter what the procedure of law stated, as long as it was followed, deprivation of one's life and liberty was not illegal. This view, however, changed with the landmark decision in Maneka Gandhi v. Union of India in 1979, wherein Justice Bhagwati introduced the American concept of due process, i.e., the law itself should be fair and non-violative of the other provisions of the Constitution, into the interpretation of Article 21. This opened the floodgate for the expansive interpretation of Article 21, by the Supreme Court, which has been used to protect not just civil and political rights of the citizens, but also guarantee socio-economic rights which were not originally justifiable in the Constitution.
Answered by Quest, 12 Mar '13 05:20 pm

 
  
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3.

Right to Life and Liberty. Article 21 states that no one maybe deprived of their life or liberty unless it is by due procedure of law. In the first 25 years or so, this Article was very narrowly interpreted by the Supreme Court to mean that no matter what the procedure of law stated, as long as it was followed, deprivation of one's life and liberty was not illegal. This view, however, changed with the landmark decision in Maneka Gandhi v. Union of India in 1979, wherein Justice Bhagwati introduced the American concept of due process, i.e., the law itself should be fair and non-violative of the other provisions of the Constitution, into the interpretation of Article 21. This opened the floodgate for the expansive interpretation of Article 21, by the Supreme Court, which has been used to protect not just civil and political rights of the citizens, but also guarantee socio-economic rights which were not originally justifiable in the Constitution.
Answered by Snigdha G, 12 Mar '13 04:57 pm

 
  
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4.

Protection of life and personal Liberty
Answered by conviction, 12 Mar '13 04:48 pm

 
  
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5.

Protection of life and personal Liberty
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 12 Mar '13 04:48 pm

 
  
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6.

Protection of life and personal Liberty
Answered by rajnikant raiyarela, 12 Mar '13 04:48 pm

 
  
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