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Q.

How the language 'ENGLISH' originated?
this question is fr all specially who are very interested in this language....

Asked by sandeep kumar srivastava, 12 Jul '09 01:43 am
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Answers (7)

1.

The history of English begins a little after A.D. 600. The ancestors of the language were wandering in the forests of northern Europe. Their language was a part of Germanic branch of Indo-European Family. The people talking this language spread to the northern coast of Europe in the time of Roman Empire. Among this people the tribes called Angels,Saxons,Jutes which is called Anglo-Saxons come to England. The first Latin effect was in that period. Latin effected the language with the merchants traveling the tribes. Some of the words taken from Latin are; kettle,wine,cheese, butter, cheap. Also in the 14th century Rome Empire weakened because Goths attacked to Mediterranean countries of Roman Empire and Anglo-Saxons attacked to empire. On the other hand the Celtic tribes in Scotland and Wales developed. At the end in 410 the last roman emperor left the island to Celtic and Anglo-Saxons. Celtic and Anglo-Saxons fought for 100 years and Anglo-Saxons killed all the Celtics. ...more
Answered by anantharaman, 12 Jul '09 02:06 am

 
  
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2.

Well everyone has given the same answer here so I shall try to be different. The English language is a melting pot of words, handed down, borrowed or created over more than 2000 years. Its still expanding, changing and trading. English is not purely English at all moreover a ragbag of diverse words that have come to to the island from all around the world. Words have entered the language in all sorts of ways: with invaders, migrants, tradesmen; in stories, artworks, technologies and scientific concepts; with those who hold power, and those who try to overthrow the powerful. The Celts were the earliest inhabitants of the British Isles and left their mark on the language. Then came the Romans. Then there were the Anglo Saxon dialects from the German tribes. Then the Vikings came from Denmark. Then the Norman invaded. Then the war between England and France. then the printers came along William Caxon and Samuel Johnson with his dictionary. Technology and global trading did the rest. ...more
Answered by Janis, 12 Jul '09 02:15 am

 
  
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3.

MORE IMPORTANT IS NOT HOW ENGLISH IS ORIGINATED BUT THE MORE CONCERNED WHY ENGLISH DOMINATES MAXIMUM PARTS OF THE WORLD. AND THAT IS BRITSHER\'S WITTYNESS AND FAR SIGHTEDNESS
Answered by satnam bali, 12 Jul '09 02:32 am

 
  
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4.

English is a West Germanic language that originated from the Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Britain by Germanic invaders from various parts of what is now northwest Germany and the northern Netherlands. Initially, Old English was a diverse group of dialects, reflecting the varied origins of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms of England. One of these dialects, Late West Saxon, eventually came to dominate. The original Old English language was then influenced by two further waves of invasion: the first by speakers of the Scandinavian branch of the Germanic language family, who conquered and colonized parts of Britain in the 8th and 9th centuries; the second by the Normans in the 11th century, who spoke Old Norman and ultimately developed an English variety of this called Anglo-Norman. These two invasions caused English to become \"mixed\" to some degree. Cohabitation with the Scandinavians resulted in a significant grammatical simplification and lexical enrichment of the Anglo- ...more
Answered by Joseph Chacko, 12 Jul '09 02:00 am

 
  
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5.

English is a West Germanic language that originated from the Anglo-Frisian and Lower Saxon dialects brought to Britain by Germanic settlers and Roman auxiliary troops from various parts of what is now northwest Germany and the northern Netherlands[citation needed] in the 5th century. One of these Germanic tribes were the Angles, who may have come from Angeln, and Bede wrote that their whole nation came to Britain, leaving their former land empty. The names 'England' (or 'Aenglaland') and English are derived from the name of this tribe.The Anglo Saxons began invading around 449 AD from the regions of Denmark and Jutland, Before the Anglo-Saxons arrived in England the native population spoke Brythonic, a Celtic language. Although the most significant changes in dialect occurred after the Norman invasion of 1066, the language retained its name and the pre-Norman invasion dialect is now known as Old English. Initially, Old English was a diverse group of dialects, reflecting the varied ...more
Answered by Pardeep kapoor, 12 Jul '09 01:49 am

 
  
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6.

English is a West Germanic language that originated in Anglo-Saxon England. As a result of the military, economic, scientific, political, and cultural influence of the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries and of the United States since the mid 20th century, English is a West Germanic language that originated from the Anglo-Frisian and Lower Saxon dialects brought to Britain by Germanic settlers and Roman auxiliary troops from various parts of what is now northwest Germany and the northern Netherlands in the 5th century. One of these Germanic tribes were the Angles,[19] who may have come from Angeln, and Bede wrote that their whole nation came to Britain, leaving their former land empty. The names \'England\' (or \'Aenglaland\') and English are derived from the name of this tribe
Answered by SURYAKANT, 12 Jul '09 01:47 am

 
  
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7.

English is a West Germanic language that originated in Anglo-Saxon England. As a result of the military, economic, scientific, political, and cultural influence of the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries and of the United States since the mid 20th century,[7][8][9][10] it has become the lingua franca in many parts of the world.[11][12] It is used extensively as a second language and as an official language in Commonwealth countries and many international organizations. Historically, English originated from several dialects, now collectively termed Old English, which were brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers beginning in the 5th century. The language was heavily influenced by the Old Norse language of Viking invaders. After the Norman conquest, Old English developed into Middle English, borrowing heavily from the Norman (Anglo-French) vocabulary and spelling conventions. Modern English developed from there notably with the Great Vowel Shift that ...more
Answered by SHREEYA CHUGH, 12 Jul '09 01:47 am

 
  
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