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Q.

Where does the energy from a nuclear bomb come from?

Tags: sex, science, nuclear bomb
Asked by Sudhakar Kuruvada, 15 May '13 01:24 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

An atom bomb converts mass directly into energy. There are two basic types - fission bombs and fusion bombs. In a fission bomb heavy atoms break apart into lighter atoms, in a fusion bomb light atoms combine to make heavier atoms. What they have in common is that the atoms and other particles that come out of the reaction are lighter than those that went into it. Mass disappears. We know that mass cannot just disappear, but we also know from the famous E=mc^2 that mass and energy are interchangeable, so the missing mass has to be converted into energy.
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Answered by anil garg, 29 Jun '13 01:16 am

 
  
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2.

That depends on the type of bomb.

An uranium- or plutonium-based bomb operates by splitting the atoms apart, releasing vast amounts of energy in the process. This is known as atomic fission.

A hydrogen bomb works by forcing the individual atoms together to form heavier elements such as helium, which releases even more energy. (And with less radiation, too!) This is called atomic fusion, and is how stars like our sun generate their power.

(Modern fusion bombs also have a small fission bomb at their core, to generate the high heat needed to start the fusion process.)
Answered by rajan, 15 May '13 01:34 pm

 
  
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3.

There are many possible different stable states (that is, stable nuclei), with different number of nucleons and different binding energies. However there are also some general tendencies for the specific binding energy per one nucleon (proton or neutron) in the nuclei. States of simple nuclei (like hidrogen or helium) have the lowest specific nucleon binding energy amongst all elements, but the higher is the atomic number, the higher the specific energy gets. However, for the very heavy nuclei the specific binding energy starts to drop again.
Answered by Psycho, 15 May '13 01:28 pm

 
  
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4.

Mple. Such a chain reaction could be used as an explosive weapon or controlled to provide energy for peaceful use.

As world war II commenced, a number of theorists and engineers, around the world, set out to harness nuclear chain reaction energy both in the form of reactors and explosively as a weapon. A second fissile element was discovered Pu239 or plutonium and it was rapidly bred in the new reactors for weapons use. A secret atomic weapons project called the Manhattan project exploded the first nuclear weapon in 1945. '... Trinity was the first test of technology for an atomic weapon. It was conducted by the United States on July 16, 1945, at a location 35 miles (56 km) southeast of Socorro, New Mexico on the White Sands Proving Ground, headquartered near Alamogordo. Trinity was a test of an implosion-design plutonium device. The weapon's codename was "The Gadget". Using the same conceptual design, the Fat Man device was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9. The Trinity deton ...more
Answered by Rocking Raaj, 15 May '13 01:27 pm

 
  
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