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Q.

Where do hurricanes get all of their energy?

Asked by Good Citizen, 24 Feb '09 10:27 pm
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Answers (5)

 
1.

Great amounts of energy are transferred when warm water is evaporated from tropical seas. This energy is stored within the water vapour contained in moist air. As this air ascends, 90% of the stored energy is released by condensation, giving rise to the towering cumulus clouds and rain. The release of heat energy warms the air locally causing a further decrease in pressure aloft. Consequently, air rises faster to fill this area of low pressure, and more warm moist air is drawn off the sea feeding further energy to the system. Thus a self-sustaining heat engine is created.
Answered by Janis, 25 Feb '09 01:49 am

 
  
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2.

Solar
Answered by Shahryar Pax, 25 Feb '09 02:04 am

 
  
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3.

Warm ocean waters (at least 80F / 27C) throughout a depth of about 150 ft. (46 m). An atmosphere which cools fast enough with height such that it is potentially unstable to moist convection.
Answered by Joseph Chacko, 25 Feb '09 01:33 am

 
  
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4.

For a tropical wave to turn into a hurricane, it needs something to give it a twist and it needs convection," A hurricane is a giant heat engine like a boiler, taking moisture from the surface and shooting it skyward. As water vapor condenses into rain, evaporates and condenses again, it releases energy that helps drive the engine. "Our microwave atmospheric profiler measures how temperature and water vapor are distributed inside the hurricane," storm's internal processes energy.
Answered by Naresh Swain, 24 Feb '09 10:35 pm

 
  
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5.

The inertia gathers momentum and speed and once it reaches its critical speed and rolls further, it only adds up more power and energy before it eventually weakens.
Answered by S. Ramesh, 24 Feb '09 10:32 pm

 
  
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