Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

Fortune favours the brave. What does tis phrase mean?

Tags: brave, fortune, tis phrase
Asked by Vinayak Raj, 09 May '08 02:00 pm
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (6)

1.

Quite simply it means people who act decisively make their own fate.
Answered by Janis, 10 May '08 02:38 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

The phrase means that Fortuna, the Goddess of luck, is more likely to help those that take risks, take action, and develop their skills proactively. It was first written by Terence, who lived in the second century BC, in his play "Phormio" but it has been quoted many times since. The phrase is often associated with Virgil's epic poem, the Aeneid, appearing in book 10 line 284, in the slightly different form "audentis fortuna iuvat.
Answered by anil garg, 06 Sep '09 12:01 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

Fortune favours the bold:

Fortune favours the bold, Fortune favours the brave, Fortune helps the brave , and Fortune favours the strong are common translations of the famous and often-quoted ancient Latin proverb "Fortis fortuna adiuvat".

The phrase means that Fortuna, the Goddess of luck, is more likely to help those that take risks, take action, and develop their skills proactively. It was first written by Terence, who lived in the second century BC, in his play "Phormio", but it has been quoted many times since. The phrase is often associated with Virgil's epic poem, the Aeneid, appearing in book 10 line 284, in the slightly different form "audentis fortuna iuvat."

The phrase was also used by Alexander the Great to describe his bold way of leading the Macedonian phalanx and his companion cavalry with him in front.[citation needed]

It was the station motto of airbase RAF East Fortune in Scotland. It is also the motto of English football team KAG FC. It is also the motto f ...more
Answered by DRSiva, 09 May '08 02:52 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

The phrase means that Fortuna, the Goddess of luck, is more likely to help those that take risks, take action, and develop their skills proactively.
Answered by GOPI KUMAR, 09 May '08 02:03 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
5.

He who belies in himself and is willoing to take the rsik, irrespective of whether he gains or loses will succeed in life.
Answered by Lakshmi Rajesh, 09 May '08 02:02 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
6.

It means that the one who is outgoing and adventurous in spirit always stands to gain. He always succeeds in life. Live life hesitantly and you go nowhere.
Answered by Manisha Mehra, 09 May '08 02:01 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining

Related Answer

Q.
A

The British invented Football in 1863, full name Association football, the term football is the formal name while soccer is its nickname that was crea..more

Answered by Kishenjit Sinha