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Q.

When were the first stars formed, and what were they like?

Tags: first stars
Asked by Jack Johnson, 24 Oct '07 06:58 am
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Answers (9)

 
1.

I have collected this data for you from the net.

The first stars in the universe died long before scientists could get a look at them. Today, billions of years after the last of these first stars burned out, Alliance researchers are tracking them down.
Millions of years after the Big Bang, and the universe wasn't much of a party.
It started out great. An incredible explosion occurred - scientists still don't know why or even what forces were at work - and space, time, and all the matter that will ever be in the universe were born. Within the first second, protons, neutrons, and electrons formed. Within three minutes, protons and neutrons combined into the nuclei of what would eventually be hydrogen and helium atoms. The joint, as they say, was jumpin'.



University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign But then things cooled off - literally. The universe started at about 1032 kelvin but was down to about one billion kelvin in three minutes. The next major "signal event" in ...more
Answered by gem mina, 31 Oct '07 07:58 am

 
  
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2.

Noone can seriously estimate accurately as to when the stars first came into existence for the first time. The universe had to there always, since from when, no one can say, because there could never have been a vacuum at any point of time, whether a billion years or 10 billion years ago. It is generally theorised that high density clouds at one time disintegrated to form these stars due to gravitational factors and may be other reasons too. May be like the silver reflection of dense clouds, the original stars may have been just specks of silver out in the vast expanse. But then who has seen it. I for one would never take a guess on that, when they really came into existence but would go by the commonly theorised versions of them being probably a billion years ago. Who am I to even delve into such a subject, about which my level of ignorance is not just zero but may be on the negative side.
Answered by Alpha, 31 Oct '07 11:53 am

 
  
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3.

I tried to explain with my knowledge in my answer to your Universe Q. Continuing further to that....many secrets are out in form of clues (thousands of experiments from ground & space). A stars chemical composition is not a challenge to understand, say the gases & reactions in a star (Hydrogen and Helium). But what made the initial conditions resulting in the formation of stars? To answer such questions, there is a dedicated discipline known as Super Computing apart from Telescopes. Super computing clusters are used to simulate many possible models using huge data. My labs (like Almaden, Watson, Haifa, etc) are an active participant in such studies, plus my employer is a world leader in the super computing solutions. To learn more, please read these bookmarks:

http://domino.watson.ibm.com/comm/pr.nsf/pages/rsc. fractalstar.html
http://domino.watson.ibm.com/comm/pr.nsf/pages/ news.20040223_bluegene.html

As we know it was a Supernova explosion to all begin with! Aftermath was the ...more
Answered by Sukhoi, 26 Oct '07 12:26 am

 
  
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4.

The first stars formed when the universe finally cooled enough and expanded enough to allow gravity to go to work. Hydrogen and helium were drawn together to form "gravity-bound puddles of gas," as Norman, a senior research scientist at NCSA and a professor of astronomy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, calls them. These puddles, also called primordial star-forming clouds, then condensed to a star's density relatively quickly.

"It took 100 million years for those clouds to form, but then it only took about 100,000 years for the first stars to form from them," Norman says.

Answered by ANURADHA PATHAKJ, 24 Oct '07 11:29 am

 
  
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5.

For many millions of years after our universe first formed no stars existed, and then there was one. That primordial star was likely a massive blazing behemoth that burned brighter and faster than any star around today.
A new computer model now suggests that it also formed much earlier than previously thought.
Other studies have estimated that the first star sparked into existence some 155 million years after our universe exploded into life in the Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago.
Answered by anupama kumar, 24 Oct '07 10:36 am

 
  
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6.

Solid things
reforming into molten form after the big bang and spreading out
as they accumulate more energy they become what the usual stage of a star is
Answered by sap pristine, 24 Oct '07 07:31 am

 
  
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7.

The BA is enkightening
Answered by anil garg, 21 Mar '11 01:16 am

 
  
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8.

Sorry sir i have no idea abt this
Answered by Crystal Clear, 24 Oct '07 05:49 pm

 
  
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9.

Sorry no idea sirji...
Answered by knight, 24 Oct '07 12:31 pm

 
  
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