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Q.

When did Muslims enter India ?

Tags: india, muslims enter
Asked by azam khan, 07 Jan '12 11:45 am
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Answers (9)

1.

The Arab Muslims entered India in 711, the same year their religious compatriots in the West entered Spain. They conquered the area known as Sind in the Indus River valley (modern Pakistan). It is hard to imagine two religions and civilizations so different in their outlooks as Islam and Hinduism. Whereas Islam saw all people as equal before God, India's rigid caste system presented a highly stratified social structure sanctioned by religion. On the other hand, while Hinduism was incredibly tolerant of a multitude of gods, Islam was strictly monotheistic. For better or worse, the two cultures have co-existed, though not always peacefully, since the Arabs arrived until the present day.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 07 Jan '12 12:24 pm

 
  
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2.

The coming of Islam to India (711-c.1800)
FC52
FC52 in the Hyperflow of History.
Introduction

Until 711 C.E., India had faced many invaders, but no substantial challenges on both a military and cultural level. The Persians and Greeks had confronted India with highly developed civilizations, but also had reached the limits of their expansion by the time they arrived there. The various nomadic peoples who entered India between the second century B.C.E. and eighth century C.E. may have been more potent military threats, but their cultures were thoroughly absorbed by India. However, in 711 C.E., India faced for the first time a vital people with a culture and religion both as sophisticated and powerful as its own: Islam.

Much of the relationship between Islam and Hinduism hinged on a battle that took place at the Talas River in Central Asia in 751 C.E. between the expanding empires of the Arab Muslims and T'ang China. The Arab victory in that battle not only stopped the T'ang ...more
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 07 Jan '12 01:48 pm

 
  
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3.

Emboldened by their success in annexing Khurasan in 643 C.E., the first Arab army penetrated deep into Zabul by way of Seistan which at that time was part of India, territorially as well as culturally. After a prolonged and grim struggle the invader was defeated and driven out. But in a subsequent attack, the Arab general Abdul Rahman was able to conquer Zabul and levy tribute from Kabul (653 C.E.). Kabul paid the tribute but reluctantly and irregularly. To ensure its regular payment another Arab general Yazid bin Ziyad attempted retribution in 683. But he was killed and his army put to flight with great slaughter. The war against Kabul was renewed in 695, but as it became prolonged it bore no fruitful results. Some attempts to force the Hindu king of Kabul into submission were made in the reign of Caliph Al-Mansur (745-775 C.E.), but they met only with partial success and the Ghaznavid Turks found the Hindus ruling over Kabul in 986 C.E.
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 07 Jan '12 11:49 am

 
  
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4.

711 ad
Answered by Trance, 07 Jan '12 01:08 pm

 
  
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5.

90%of muslims origin of india
Answered by HEERA, 07 Jan '12 12:27 pm

 
  
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6.

The Muslims entered Sind, India, in 711 C.E., the same year they entered Spain. Their entry in India was prompted by an attempt to free the civilian Muslim hostages whose ship was taken by sea pirates in the territory of Raja Dahir, King of Sind. After diplomatic attempts failed, Hajjaj bin Yusuf, the Umayyad governor in Baghdad, dispatched a 17-year-old commander by the name Muhammad bin Qasim with a small army. Muhammad bin Qasim defeated Raja Dahir at what is now Hyderabad in Pakistan. In pursuing the remnant of Dahir's army and his sons supporters (Indian kings), Muhammad bin Qasim fought at Nirun, Rawar, Bahrore, Brahmanabad, Aror, Dipalpur and Multan. By 713 C.E., he established his control in Sind and parts of Punjab up to the borders of Kashmir. A major part of what is now Pakistan came under Muslim control in 713 C.E. and remained so throughout the centuries until some years after the fall of the Mughal Empire in 1857.
Muhammad bin Qasims treatment of the Indian population w ...more
Answered by truth exposed, 07 Jan '12 12:04 pm

 
  
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7.

14 th century AD
Answered by Surender Rao, 07 Jan '12 11:46 am

 
  
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8.

Some where in 14th century
Answered by iqbal seth, 07 Jan '12 11:45 am

 
  
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9.

Muhammad ghori defeated prithiviraj chauhan the rajput ruler in 1192AD in second battle of taraain. and i feel this was the foundation stone for muslim in india
Source: self
Answered by ambuj kumar, 07 Jan '12 12:14 pm

 
  
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