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Q.

What were the four key compromises that made the constitution possible?

Tags: education, politics & government, law & legal
Asked by vijay shukla, 08 Feb '13 11:04 am
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Answers (5)

 
1.

The Great Compromise (Connecticut Compromise): the writers of the Virginia Plan wanted a bicameral legislature with both houses controlled by population (which was beneficial to them). The writers of the New Jersey Plan wanted a unicameral legislature in which everyone had the same amount of representatives. The Connecticut delegates came up with the Great Plan -- a bicameral legislature, with one house controlled by population, the other would have two representatives from each state.
Answered by Quest, 08 Feb '13 11:31 am

 
  
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2.

Three-Fifths Compromise". The sheer number of slaves in the South would increase the population of those states, which affected the proportional representation in the House of Representatives. The "three-fifths" compromise was an attempt to reduce the representation of the South. (Ironically, although it is seen today as a slap at African residents, the effect was actually reduced the political influence of the slave states.)

"Connecticut Compromise" or "Great Compromise". At the time, the states were still considered to be sovereign entities, and small states insisted on equal status with the others. Large states, naturally, thought that political power should be proportional to population. The compromise was to have one house of Congress (the House of Representaties) represented based on population, and the other (the Senate) to be represented equally.
Answered by iqbal seth, 08 Feb '13 11:08 am

 
  
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3.

Three-Fifths Compromise". The sheer number of slaves in the South would increase the population of those states, which affected the proportional representation in the House of Representatives. The "three-fifths" compromise was an attempt to reduce the representation of the South. (Ironically, although it is seen today as a slap at African residents, the effect was actually reduced the political influence of the slave states.)
Answered by shrishti, 15 Feb '13 09:43 pm

 
  
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4.

Three-Fifths Compromise". The sheer number of slaves in the South would increase the population of those states, which affected the proportional representation in the House of Representatives. The "three-fifths" compromise was an attempt to reduce the representation of the South. (Ironically, although it is seen today as a slap at African residents, the effect was actually reduced the political influence of the slave states.)
Answered by gagan gupta, 14 Feb '13 02:37 pm

 
  
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5.

The Great Compromise (Connecticut Compromise): the writers of the Virginia Plan wanted a bicameral legislature with both houses controlled by population (which was beneficial to them). The writers of the New Jersey Plan wanted a unicameral legislature in which everyone had the same amount of representatives. The Connecticut delegates came up with the Great Plan -- a bicameral legislature, with one house controlled by population, the other would have two representatives from each state.

The three/five Compromise, this was done to appease the Southern states, which wanted to count their slaves as population as to gain more representatives. It was agreed that a slave would count as three/five of a person. This was important because it helped determine how many representatives in the House a state could have. If the Compromise hadn't been enacted, John Adams would have won the election of eighteen hundred (Which was one of history's nastiest elections).

There was also the compromise ...more
Answered by Psycho, 08 Feb '13 11:15 am

 
  
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