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Q.

Why are business districts usually called 'downtown'?

Tags: money, careers, education
Asked by Neha Sahi, 15 Oct '09 12:45 pm
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Answers (5)

 
1.

Downtown is a term primarily used in North America to refer to a city's core or central business district, usually in a geographical, commercial, and community sense.

The term is thought to have been coined in New York City, where it was in use by the 1830s to refer to the original town at the southern tip of the island of Manhattan.[1] As the town of New York grew into a city, the only direction it could grow on the island was toward the north, proceeding upriver from the original settlement (the "up" and "down" terminology in turn came from the customary map design in which up was north and down was south).[1] Thus, anything north of the original town became known as "uptown", while the original town (which was also New York's only major center of business at the time) became known as "downtown".[1]

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Answered by vivek singh, 15 Oct '09 12:49 pm

 
  
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2.

Downtown is a term primarily used in North America to refer to a city's core or central business district, usually in a geographical, commercial, and community sense.

The term is thought to have been coined in New York City, where it was in use by the 1830s to refer to the original town at the southern tip of the island of Manhattan.[1] As the town of New York grew into a city, the only direction it could grow on the island was toward the north, proceeding upriver from the original settlement (the "up" and "down" terminology in turn came from the customary map design in which up was north and down was south).[1] Thus, anything north of the original town became known as "uptown", while the original town (which was also New York's only major center of business at the time) became known as "downtown".[1]

During the late 19th century, the term was gradually adopted by cities across the United States and Canada to refer to the historical core of the city (which was most often the same ...more
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 16 Oct '09 03:53 pm

 
  
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3.

Anything north of the original town became known as "uptown", while the original town (which was also New York's only major center of business at the time) became known as "downtown"
Answered by prashant prashar, 20 Oct '09 10:12 am

 
  
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4.

Barrowed from us english
Answered by Dinesh C S, 17 Oct '09 06:32 pm

 
  
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5.

The downtown section of a city, generally consisting of retail, office, hotel, entertainment, and governmental land uses with some high Density housing.
Answered by Pardeep kapoor, 15 Oct '09 12:50 pm

 
  
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