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Q.

What is Wu Wei ? according to Taoism

Tags: religion & spirituality, taoism, wei
Asked by sudhakar kuruvada, 15 Mar '13 08:49 am
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Answers (5)

 
1.

Wu Wei means "non-action" literally translated. It is the idea of "actionless action". One does not need to be agressive to make things happen or to win battles. It ties in with the Taoist virtue of nonagression/noncompetition.

Examples: a musician does not compete with a musical score... An artist does not rush his/her work...An athlete may sidestep an opponent... A friend listens and does not inturrup another friend's story.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 15 Mar '13 08:50 am

 
  
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2.

Wu Wei means "non-action" literally translated. It is the idea of "actionless action". One does not need to be agressive to make things happen or to win battles. It ties in with the Taoist virtue of nonagression/noncompetition.
Answered by Quest, 15 Mar '13 01:06 pm

 
  
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3.

Wu Wei means "non-action" literally translated
Answered by anantharaman, 15 Mar '13 09:46 am

 
  
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4.

Wu Wei means "non-action" literally translated. It is the idea of "actionless action". One does not need to be agressive to make things happen or to win battles. It ties in with the Taoist virtue of nonagression/noncompetition.

Examples: a musician does not compete with a musical score... An artist does not rush his/her work...An athlete may sidestep an opponent... A friend listens and does not inturrup another friend's story.
Answered by Sudhakar Kuruvada, 15 Mar '13 09:29 am

 
  
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5.

The principle of wu wei contains certain implications. The first being the need to consciously experience ourselves as part of the unity of life that is the Tao. Lao Tzu writes that we must be quiet and watchful, learning to listen to both our own inner voices and to the voices of our environment in a non-interfering, receptive manner. In this way we also learn to rely on more than just our intellect and logical mind to gather and assess information. We develop and trust our intuition as our direct connection to the Tao. We heed the intelligence of our whole body, not only our brain. And we learn through our own experience. All of this allows us to respond readily to the needs of the environment, which of course includes ourselves. And just as the Tao functions in a manner to promote harmony and balance, our own actions, performed in the spirit of wu-wei, produce the same result.
Answered by iqbal seth, 15 Mar '13 09:20 am

 
  
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