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Q.

What is the speed of light in vacuum?

Tags: science
Asked by Pramod Kumar, 16 Oct '13 10:39 am
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Answers (7)

1.

The speed of light in vacuum, commonly denoted c, is a universal physical constant important in many areas of physics. Its value is exactly 299,792,458 metres per second, a figure that is exact because the length of the metre is defined from this constant and the international standard for time.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 16 Oct '13 10:59 am

 
  
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2.

Three multiplied by ten raised to power of eight meters per second
Answered by Manoj Joshi, 16 Oct '13 10:40 am

 
  
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3.

Three multiplied by ten raised to power of eight meters per second
Answered by aflatoon, 18 Oct '13 01:41 pm

 
  
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4.

Three multiplied by ten raised to power of eight meters per second
Answered by Quest, 16 Oct '13 07:17 pm

 
  
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5.

8
Speed of light in vaccuum = 3 x 10 m/s.
Answered by subodh kumar goel, 16 Oct '13 03:05 pm

 
  
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6.

The speed of light in vacuum to be exactly 299,792,458 m/s.
Answered by GOPI KUMAR, 16 Oct '13 11:25 am

 
  
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7.

The speed of light in vacuum is two. ninenine eight x ten to the power eight meter/second
Answered by Shravani KaShravan, 16 Oct '13 10:42 am

 
  
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