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Q.

What is the Raman effect.?

Tags: science, raman effect, news & events
Asked by truth exposed, 27 Jan '13 04:16 pm
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Answers (8)

 
1.

When photons are scattered from an atom or molecule, most photons are elastically scattered (Rayleigh scattering), such that the scattered photons have the same kinetic energy (frequency and wavelength) as the incident photons. However, a small fraction of the scattered photons (approximately 1 in 10 million) are scattered by an excitation, with the scattered photons having a frequency different from, and usually lower than, that of the incident photons In a gas, Raman scattering can occur with a change in energy of a molecule due to a transition (see energy level). Chemists are concerned primarily with such transitional Raman effect.
This scattering is the reason of the color of the Ocean and sky remaining blue.
Source: wikipedia
Answered by Josna, 27 Jan '13 06:12 pm

 
  
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2.

A change of wavelength exhibited by some of the radiation scattered in a medium. The effect is specific to the molecules that cause it, and so can be used in spectroscopic analysis
Answered by joyesh chakraborty, 27 Jan '13 05:45 pm

 
  
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3.

A change of wavelength exhibited by some of the radiation scattered in a medium. The effect is specific to the molecules that cause it, and so can be used in spectroscopic analysis
Answered by LIPSIKA, 27 Jan '13 05:42 pm

 
  
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4.

Forgotten
Answered by maxfun, 27 Jan '13 04:19 pm

 
  
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5.

Raman effect, change in the wavelength of light that occurs when a light beam is deflected by molecules. The phenomenon is named for Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman, who discovered it in 1928. When a beam of light traverses a dust-free, transparent sample of a chemical compound, a small fraction of the light emerges in directions other than that of the incident (incoming) beam. Most of this scattered light is of unchanged wavelength. A small part, however, has wavelengths different from that of the incident light; its presence is a result of the Raman effect.

Raman scattering is perhaps most easily understandable if the incident light is considered as consisting of particles, or photons (with energy proportional to frequency), that strike the molecules of the sample. Most of the encounters are elastic, and the photons are scattered with unchanged energy and frequency. On some occasions, however, the molecule takes up energy from or gives up energy to the photons, which are thereby ...more
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 28 Jan '13 03:17 pm

 
  
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6.

But today, Raman's discovery has finally become a breakthrough technology. Hand-held scanners called Raman scanners, weighing just one-third of a kilo, are being used by US narcotics squads and airports to detect drugs. Security experts think that Raman scanners may be the best devices to detect explosives carried by terrorists. Safety inspectors are using Raman scanners to detect hazardous chemicals and gases. Police forces are using Raman scanners for forensic work.

The scanners work by detecting the molecular structure of the object they are scanning. If you shoot a beam of light on an object, a very small part of it interacts with the atoms of the object and scatters light in a pattern or spectrum unique to that particular molecule. This is the Raman Effect. It is difficult to detect, and typically needs lasers to amplify the signal. Every molecule has a different Raman pattern. This is why Raman scanning has been called the fingerprinting of the universe: it can identify substa ...more
Source: google search
Answered by anil garg, 27 Jan '13 11:09 pm

 
  
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7.

Sometimes a rainbow appears and delights our eyes. We see in it shades of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. The white ray of the sun includes all these colors. When a beam of sunlight is passed through a glass prism a patch of these *color- bands are seen. This is called the spectrum. The Spectro- meter is an apparatus used to study
the spectrum. Spectral lines in it are characteristic of the light passing through the prism. A beam of light that causes a single spectral line is said to be monochromatic.

When a beam of monochromatic light passes through a transparent substance (a
substance which allows light to pass through it), the beam is scattered. Raman spent a long time in the study of the scattered light.. On February 28, 1928, he observed two low intensity spectral line corresponding to the incident mono- chromatic light. Years of his labor had borne fruit. It was clear that though the incident light was monochromatic, the
scattered light due to it, was ...more
Answered by jakir hussain, 27 Jan '13 06:31 pm

 
  
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8.

Raman scattering or the Raman effect is the inelastic scattering of a photon
Answered by iqbal seth, 27 Jan '13 05:39 pm

 
  
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