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Q.

WHAT IS the difference between a "lawyer" and an "attorney"?

Tags: relationships, education, science
Asked by anantharaman, 27 May '10 11:30 pm
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Answers (4)

 
1.

A lawyer, according to Black\'s Law Dictionary, is \"a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person licensed to practice law attorney,a short form of Attorney at law, is official name for a lawyer in certain countries, including, Argentina, Japan, Sri Lanka and the United States. The term was also used in England and Wales for lawyers who practised in the common law courts. In 1873, however, attorneys were redesignated solicitors (which had always been the title for those lawyers who practised in the courts of equity). Attorneys did not generally actually appear as advocates in the higher courts, a role reserved (as it still generally is) for barristers. Retrieved from \"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attorney_at_law\"
Answered by M H Kisan, 28 May '10 12:56 am

 
  
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2.

Not much of a difference ...both waste time and money of their client and never help client get justice till they have robbed them of the last penny
Answered by Kuldeep Khatau, 28 May '10 01:06 am

 
  
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3.

Attorny work under a lawyer minimum of three years than he will become a lawyer ............i think
Answered by kamal purohit, 27 May '10 11:39 pm

 
  
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4.

Junior senior
Answered by Satyakam Nayak, 27 May '10 11:32 pm

 
  
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