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Q.

What is the legend about '
Jamshed-e-Navroz '?

Tags: religion & spirituality, navroz, jamshed
Asked by sudhakar kuruvada, 18 Apr '13 06:42 am
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Answers (5)

1.

Jamshed-e-Navroz is mentioned in the Persian Book of Kings or Shah Nemeh by Firdausi. This festival was first celebrated by King Jamshed after whom the festival is named. It is celebrated to commemorate the ascent of the King on the day of Navroz. Nav means new and roz means day.The day coincided with that of vernal equinox meaning equal day and equal night. The day also marks the transition from winter to summer. Named after King Jamshed, Jamshed-e-Navroz is a pagan pastoral festivalcelebrated by the Parsis with lots of gusto. On this day it is customary for the king to be weighed in gold and silver which is later distributed among the poor.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 18 Apr '13 06:44 am

 
  
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2.

Legend

Jamshed-e-Navroz is mentioned in the Persian Book of Kings or Shah Nemeh by Firdausi. This festival was first celebrated by King Jamshed after whom the festival is named. It is celebrated to commemorate the ascent of the King on the day of Navroz. Nav means new and roz means day.

The day coincided with that of vernal equinox meaning equal day and equal night. The day also marks the transition from winter to summer. Named after King Jamshed, Jamshed-e-Navroz is a pagan pastoral festivalcelebrated by the Parsis with lots of gusto. On this day it is customary for the king to be weighed in gold and silver which is later distributed among the poor.
Answered by Quest, 18 Apr '13 12:05 pm

 
  
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3.

The advent of spring in the months of February and March and the vernal equinox are the two events that usher the festival of Jamshed-e-Navroz. The actual time when the changes take place is noted down in Iran and the information is passed on all over the world to all Zoroastrians. This festival is mentioned in Shah Nameh, the Persian `Book of Kings' written by Firdausi. According to Firdausi's book, this festival was celebrated by the kings of Persia, Cyrus and Darius, to rejoice in the spring and in their own glory. According to a popular legend, the mythical Persian king Jamshed was the first person to celebrate this festival. The Shah Nameh also states that the feast commemorates the ascension of King Jamshed into the skies, in a chariot built by the demons he had subdued and forced into the service of mortals
Answered by aflatoon, 18 Apr '13 09:11 am

 
  
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4.

The day has an equal amount of day and night as it coincides with that of equinox. It also marks the transition from winter to summer. The festival is a pagan pastoral event that is celebrated by Parsis with a lot of enthusiasm from all over the world. A popular ritual from the day is that the King is weighed in silver and gold, and the same amount is distributed among the poor and needy.

Navroz is celebrated on a massive scale. Parsis may be westernized, but they are very traditional when it comes to celebrating festivals. They wear new clothes along with caps and silver kurtis. Jamshed-e-Navroz symbolizes happiness, harmony and friendship. Parsi households are decorated with auspicious symbols like butterflies, stars, fishes and birds. They welcome guests by sprinkling rice and rose water and apply Tilak on their foreheads.

Jamshed-e-Navroz is a Parsi festival celebrated all round the world. The festival is celebrated on the first day of the first month of the Zoroastrian yea ...more
Answered by rajan, 18 Apr '13 07:01 am

 
  
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