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Q.

What is "Tweel" ? In which year it has came to use?

Tags: tweel
Asked by Josna, 15 Jul '10 09:14 am
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Answers (6)

 
1.

In 2005 the world met Michelin's Tweel, which inspired to rid the world of flat tires. The Tweel features a shock-absorbing rubber tread band that distributes energy to a series of thin, polyurethane spokes. And it's airless, which means no middle-of-the-night flat tire changes. The Tweel is still too noisy for regular passenger vehicles watch for it in 2020, when we're counting down the best inventions of NEXT decade
Source: time
Answered by Lavanya, 15 Jul '10 02:49 pm

 
  
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2.

The Tweel is a new airless design of tyre created by Michelin in 2005. The name is a combination of the words tire and wheel because the Tweel doesnt use a traditional wheel hub assembly. A solid inner hub mounts to the axle. Thats surrounded by polyurethane spokes arrayed in a pattern of wedges. A shear band is stretched across the spokes, forming the outer edge of the tire (the part that comes in contact with the road). The tension of the shear band on the spokes and the strength of the spokes themselves replace the air pressure of a traditional tire. The tread is then attached to the shear band. The Tweel looks sort of like a very large, futuristic bicycle wheel.
Source: How Stuff Works.
Answered by Janis, 15 Jul '10 03:40 pm

 
  
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3.

Tweels represent a type of non-pneumatic tires, meaning that they do not use air to support
the weight of the car. Michelin was the first to announce that it had developed a
revolutionary new wheel design back in 2005. The word itself is a combination between the
words 'tire' and 'wheel'. Because non-pneumatic tires don't use air to support the weight of
the car, they cannot be punctured or become flat in order to bring the car to a complete halt.
The prototype of the tweel involves using a set of spokes made out of polyurethane material
that support an outer rim on which the running tread is placed. Between the spokes and the
tire hub, there is a matrix of deformable plastic structures which flex under the load and
return to their original form afterwards. Unlike traditional airless tires which use non-flexible
materials in the wheel design, the tweel gets its equivalent of air suspension from the
polyurethane spokes, which are flexible and temporarily deformable. This speci ...more
Answered by iqbal ahmed, 15 Jul '10 07:08 pm

 
  
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4.

The thickness of a tweel tread is about the same as the thickness of a tread pattern from the steel belt to road contact surface. !
The Tweel (a portmanteau of tyre and wheel) is an experimental tyre design developed by the French tyre company Michelin. The tyre uses no air, and therefore cannot burst or become flat. !!
Tweel (also referred to as a "Tweerl", the exact pronunciation of the word is said to be impossible for humans) is a fictional Extraterrestrial from the planet Mars, featured in two short stories by Stanley G. Weinbaum. !!
Answered by Oberoi, 15 Jul '10 09:20 am

 
  
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5.

Tweel is air less tyre-rim integrated design developed by tyre manufacturing company Michelin. Owning to speed limitations, it is not used commercially.
Answered by Uncommon Freind, 15 Jul '10 09:17 am

 
  
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6.

(29 Jan 2008 )
- If you ever had a flat tire in the middle of nowhere, no spare and waited for more than two hours for someone to come and rescue you, then you might consider throwing the car's wheels right to the garbage container and buy yourself a pair of tweels. Unless you want to be a wise guy and buy an additional spare tire, just in case the other one is already flat.
Answered by Prakash, 15 Jul '10 09:32 am

 
  
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