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Q.

What Is the Difference Between an Idiom and a Phrase?

Tags: education, phrase, idiom
Asked by jafar, 06 Sep '13 05:48 pm
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Answers (7)

1.

An "idiom" is a phrase that has a specific meaning, different than you would expect based on the individual words.
"Phrase" can be any collection of words.
Answered by Anil K Chugh, 06 Sep '13 06:47 pm

 
  
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2.

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is different from the meaning of its constituent words.

Phrase on the other hand are a word or group of words read or spoken as a unit and separated by pauses or other junctures.
Answered by Stupidcommonman, 06 Sep '13 05:58 pm

 
  
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3.

All idioms are phrases, but not all phrases are idioms.
Both idioms and phrases are basic units of sentences.
Idiom is a linguistic tool that allows writers to say something in the garb of another.
Idioms are like figures of speeches.
Idioms have a meaning that is different from the dictionary meaning of the individual words in the idiom.
Phrases are used by us in our daily lives in a functional manner whereas idioms are used for ornamentation of the language.
Source: google search
Answered by anil garg, 06 Sep '13 10:58 pm

 
  
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4.

An idiom is a phrase that has a figurative meaning quite apart from its literal meaning........the finer difference may be that idiom is an artistic expression and phrase is more of a a grammatical expression
Answered by PARTHA PATHAK, 06 Sep '13 06:37 pm

 
  
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5.

An idiom is a combination of words whose meaning is not literally the same as indicated by the constituent words. (Examples: He is pain in the neck; roll up one's sleeves; etc.) In the case of ;phrase', it represents a combination of words that are a full sentence or part of a sentence. Thus, an idiom is a phrase but a phrase need not necessarily be an idiom. This is my humble explanation but I am not an expert in the English language.
Answered by Reader Writer, 06 Sep '13 06:05 pm

 
  
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6.

An idiom is usually a type of phrase that has a meaning that may not relate to the meanings of its individual words....it is a figure of speech
A phrase is a group of words forming a unit especially within a sentence or clause
Answered by Annes, 06 Sep '13 10:36 pm

 
  
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