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Q.

What is the difference between a geosynchronous orbit and a geo stationery orbit

Asked by vikram chatrath, 11 Aug '09 03:34 am
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Answers (3)

1.

In general terms, geo stationery orbit is a special orbit for which any satellite in that orbit will appear to hover stationary over a point on the earth's surface. Unlike all other classes of orbits, however, where there can be a family of orbits, there is only one geostationary orbit.For any orbit to be geostationary, it must first be geosynchronous.

A geosynchronous orbit is any orbit which has a period equal to the earth's rotational period.
As we shall soon see, this requirement is not sufficient to ensure a fixed position relative to the earth.
While all geostationary orbits must be geosynchronous, not all geosynchronous orbits are geostationary. Unfortunately, these terms are often used interchangeably.
Answered by anantharaman, 11 Aug '09 05:09 am

 
  
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2.

A geosynchronous orbit is an orbit around the Earth with an orbital period matching the Earth's sidereal rotation period. This synchronization means that for an observer at a fixed location on Earth, a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit returns to exactly the same place in the sky at exactly the same time each day. In principle, any orbit with a period equal to the Earth's rotational period is technically geosynchronous; however, the term is often used to refer to the special case of a geosynchronous orbit that is circular (or nearly circular) and at zero (or nearly zero) inclination, that is, directly above the equator. This is customarily called a geostationary orbit.
A geostationary orbit (or Geostationary Earth Orbit - GEO) is a geosynchronous orbit directly above the Earth's equator (0 latitude), with a period equal to the Earth's rotational period and an orbital eccentricity of approximately zero. From locations on the surface of the Earth, geostationary objects appear motionle ...more
Answered by Pardeep kapoor, 11 Aug '09 03:40 am

 
  
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3.

Learning the difference between a geostationary and geosynchronous satellite helps if one breaks down the words.

Geo comes from ancient Greek and means earth.

"Stationary", has its origin in the 1400s and means, as most people know, fixed in one place, not moving.

"Synchronous", has its origins in the 1600s with Latin and Greek roots and means: occurring at the same time.

Geostationary

So, a geostationary satellite is a satellite that has an orbit that appears fixed in one place relative to a point on the Earth. This type of orbit will only work for satellites that are in a circular orbit, which is in the same plane as that defined by the Earths equator. For this to occur, the satellite has to be at an orbital altitude of 22,236 miles (35,786 km). Many weather and communication satellites, including satellite TV and radio are in geostationary orbits, which gives them the ability to cover large areas of the Earth. This also explains why your satellite dish can remain poin ...more
Source: http://www.brighthub.com/science/space/articles/71638.aspx
Answered by gurpreet singh, 25 Apr '12 09:26 pm

 
  
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