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Q.

What is the conservation status of India's national bird and animal ?

Tags: india, money, environment
Asked by stalin, 23 Nov '12 05:31 pm
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Answers (5)

1.

The Bengal tiger is a tiger, and is the national animal of India and Bangladesh.Since 2010, it has been classified as an endangered species by IUCN. The total population is estimated at fewer than 2,500 individuals with a decreasing trend, and none of the Tiger Conservation Landscapes within the Bengal tiger's range is large enough to support an effective population size of 250 adult individuals.
In attempt to conserve the peacock population in India, the country has in fact protected the bird by law. Declared the country's official national bird in 1963, the peacock is depicted throughout Indian culture in art, music and poetry.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 23 Nov '12 05:41 pm

 
  
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2.

Least Concern for the Indian peafowl and Endangered for the tiger
Answered by Quest, 23 Nov '12 05:42 pm

 
  
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3.

Almost nil
Answered by iqbal seth, 24 Nov '12 08:28 am

 
  
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4.

The least concern for the Indian pea fowl and endangered tiger
Answered by rajnikant raiyarela, 23 Nov '12 05:43 pm

 
  
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5.

Only 1,411 tigers left and India is left with only 50 per cent of the total peacock population that existed at the time of Partition in 1947. While the green peacock is already believed to be extinct, the peacock may soon end up on the critically endangered list.
Answered by Sagar Singh, 23 Nov '12 05:40 pm

 
  
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