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Q.

Why Wine is also BURGUNDY

Asked by Anand Agarwal, 17 Apr '09 12:05 am
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Answers (4)

1.

BURGUNDY-is wine made in the Burgundy region in eastern France. The most famous wines produced here - those commonly referred to as Burgundies - are red wines made from Pinot Noir grapes or white wines made from Chardonnay grapes. Red and white wines are also made from other grape varieties, such as Gamay and Aligot respectively. Small amounts of ros and sparkling wine are also produced in the region. Chardonnay-dominated Chablis and Gamay-dominated Beaujolais are formally part of Burgundy wine region, but wines from those subregions are usually referred to by their own names rather than as \"Burgundy wines\".
Answered by Pardeep kapoor, 17 Apr '09 12:07 am

 
  
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2.

Burgundy is just one of hundreds of different types of wine. It is a rich red wine from the Burgundy region of France. Burgundry is best to drink whilst it is still young and served with game dishes such as Duck or Pheasant.
Answered by Janis, 17 Apr '09 01:15 am

 
  
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3.

There is archaeological evidence of vine-growing in Burgundy being established in the second century CE, although it has been speculated that Celts may have been growing vines in the region already when the Romans conquered Gaul in 51 BCE. The earliest recorded praise of Burgundy wine was written in 591 by Gregory of Tours, who compared it to the Roman wine Falernian.
Since Burgundy is land-locked, very little of its wines left the region in Medieval times, when wine was transported in barrels, meaning that waterways provided the only practical means of long-range transportation. The only part of Burgundy which could reach Paris in a practical way was the area around Auxerre by means of the Yonne River. This area includes Chablis, but had much more extensive vineyards up until the 19th century. These were the wines referred to as vin de Bourgogne in early texts.
Answered by GOPI KUMAR, 17 Apr '09 12:14 am

 
  
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4.

Its due to the name of the region in france as BURGUNDY which produces wine!!
Answered by dharamender nebhnani, 17 Apr '09 12:08 am

 
  
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