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Q.

Please Explain What is quantum Mechanics?

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Asked by venkatesaldevarajan, 24 Sep '09 07:41 am
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Answers (7)

1.

Quantum Mechanics
Quantum mechanics is the description of physics at the scale of atoms, and the even smaller scales of fundamental particles.

Quantum theory is the language of all particle theories. It is formulated in a well-defined mathematical language. It makes predictions for the relative probabilities of the various possible outcomes, but not for which outcome will occur in any given case. Interpretation of the calculations, in words and images, often leads to statements that seem to defy common sense -- because our common sense is based on experience at scales insensitive to these types of quantum peculiarities.

Because we do not directly experience objects on this scale, many aspects of quantum behavior seem strange and even paradoxical to us. Physicists worked hard to find alternative theories that could remove these peculiarities, but to no avail.

The word quantum means a definite but small amount. The basic quantum constant h, known as Planck's constant, is 6.626 ...more
Answered by anantharaman, 24 Sep '09 08:12 am

 
  
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2.

Quantum Field Theory that brings Quantum Mechanics and special relativity together to account for subatomic phenomena. In particular, the interactions of subatomic particles are described in terms of their interactions with fields, such as the electromagnetic field. However, the fields are quantized and represented by particles, such as photons for the electromagnetic field. Quantum Electrodynamics is the quantum field theory that describes the interaction of electrically charged particles via electromagnetic fields. Quantum Chromodynamics describes the action of the strong force. The Electroweak Theory, a unified theory of electromagnetic and weak forces, has considerable experimental support, and can likely be extended to include the strong force. Theories that include the gravitational force are more speculative.
Answered by Joseph Chacko, 27 Sep '09 02:52 pm

 
  
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3.

Quantum mechanics (QM) is a set of principles describing physical reality at the atomic level of matter (molecules and atoms) and the subatomic (electrons, protons, and even smaller particles). These descriptions include the simultaneous wave-like and particle-like behavior of both matter and radiation ("waveparticle duality"). In the quantum mechanics of a subatomic particle, one can never specify its state, such as its simultaneous location and velocity, with complete certainty (this is called the Heisenberg uncertainty principle).
Answered by !, 24 Sep '09 08:40 am

 
  
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4.

In terms of classical theory, the flow of energy at the universal speed of light through free space or through a material medium in the form of the electric and magnetic fields that make up electromagnetic waves such as radio waves, visible light, and gamma rays. In such a wave, time-varying electric and magnetic fields are mutually linked with each other at right angles and perpendicular to thedirection of motion. An electromagnetic wave is characterized by its intensity and the frequency of thetime variation of the electric and magnetic fields.

In terms of the modern quantum theory, electromagnetic radiation is the flow of photons (also called light quanta) through space. Photons are packets of energy h that always move with the universal speed of light. The symbol h is Planck's constant, while the value of is the same as that of the frequencyof the electromagnetic wave of classical theory. Photons having the same energy h are all alike, and their number density corresponds to the ...more
Answered by KARTIKAY SHARMA, 24 Sep '09 08:26 am

 
  
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5.

Quantum Mechanics
Quantum mechanics is the description of physics at the scale of atoms, and the even smaller scales of fundamental particles.

Quantum theory is the language of all particle theories. It is formulated in a well-defined mathematical language. It makes predictions for the relative probabilities of the various possible outcomes, but not for which outcome will occur in any given case. Interpretation of the calculations, in words and images, often leads to statements that seem to defy common sense -- because our common sense is based on experience at scales insensitive to these types of quantum peculiarities.

Because we do not directly experience objects on this scale, many aspects of quantum behavior seem strange and even paradoxical to us. Physicists worked hard to find alternative theories that could remove these peculiarities, but to no avail.

The word quantum means a definite but small amount. The basic quantum constant h, known as Planck's constant, is 6.626 ...more
Answered by Lakshmi Gayathri, 28 Sep '09 10:25 pm

 
  
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6.

Quantum mechanics (QM) is a set of principles describing physical reality at the atomic level of matter (molecules and atoms) and the subatomic (electrons, protons, and even smaller particles). These descriptions include the simultaneous wave-like and particle-like behavior of both matter[1] and radiation[2] ("waveparticle duality"). In the quantum mechanics of a subatomic particle, one can never specify its state, such as its simultaneous location and velocity, with complete certainty (this is called the Heisenberg uncertainty principle see its formula in the box to the right).

Certain systems, however, do exhibit quantum mechanical effects on a larger scale; superfluidity (the frictionless flow of a liquid at temperatures near absolute zero) is one well-known example. Quantum theory also provides accurate descriptions for many previously unexplained phenomena such as black body radiation and the stability of electron orbits. It has also given insight into the workings of many dif ...more
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 26 Sep '09 03:51 pm

 
  
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7.

Quantum mechanics is an interpretation of wave theory in terms of discrete packets
Answered by Sumit Basu, 26 Sep '09 10:23 am

 
  
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