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Q.

What is "Nelson's Eye" in Cricket ??

Tags: cricket, sports, eye
Asked by Dharmarajan, 05 Jan '12 12:04 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

The idiom turning a blind eye is used to describe the process of ignoring unpopular orders or inconvenient facts or activities.

The phrase to turn a blind eye is attributed to an incident in the life of Admiral Horatio Nelson.

Nelson was blinded in one eye early in his Royal Navy career. In 1801, during the Battle of Copenhagen cautious Admiral Sir Hyde Parker, in overall command of the British forces, sent a signal to Nelson's forces giving him discretion to withdraw. Naval orders were transmitted via a system of signal flags at that time. When this order was given to the more aggressive Nelson's attention, he lifted his telescope up to his blind eye, said "I really do not see the signal", and his forces continued to press home the attack.[1][2]

Despite the popular believe that he was disobeying orders, the signal gave Nelson permission to withdraw at his discretion. Even at the time, some of the people on his ship may have believed otherwise as they were unaware of the exact ...more
Answered by LIPSIKA, 05 Jan '12 12:07 pm

 
  
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2.

Nelson is a piece of cricket slang terminology and superstition.

The name, applied to team or individual scores of 111 or multiples thereof (known as double nelson, triple nelson, etc.) is thought to refer to Lord Nelson's lost eye, arm and leg (Nelson actually had both of his legs intact, the third missing body part is mythical).[1] Longtime cricket historian and scorer, Bill "Bearders" Frindall once referred to it online as "one eye, one arm and one etcetera", implying that Nelson's alleged third lost body part was "something else", however this is equally mythical...

It is thought by the superstitious that bad things happen on that score, although an investigation by the magazine The Cricketer in the 1990s found that wickets are no more likely to fall on Nelson and indeed, the score at which most wickets fall is 0 (a duck). It may be considered unlucky because the number resembles a wicket without bails[2] (a batsman is out when the bails fall from a wicket).

Umpire David S ...more
Answered by Report Abuse, 05 Jan '12 12:06 pm

 
  
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3.

To ignore unusual things ...
Answered by vijay, 06 Jan '12 12:48 am

 
  
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4.

Nelson is a piece of cricket slang terminology and superstition
Answered by aflatoon, 05 Jan '12 12:13 pm

 
  
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