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Q.

What is meant for Verner's law ?

Tags: careers, politics & government, law & legal
Asked by lalit mahata, 26 Apr '13 08:20 pm
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Answers (6)

 
1.

Verner's law, stated by Karl Verner in 1875, describes a historical sound change in the Proto-Germanic language whereby voiceless fricatives *f, *, *s, *h, *h, when immediately following an unstressed syllable in the same word, underwent voicing and became respectively the fricatives *b, *d, *z, *g, *g.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 26 Apr '13 08:30 pm

 
  
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2.

For an indian it means nothing. yahan roti-kapada-makaan hi mean everything
Answered by Dhakka Master, 26 Apr '13 08:21 pm

 
  
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3.

A statement of the regularity behind some apparent exceptions in the Germanic languages to Grimm's law, namely, that Proto-Germanic voiceless fricatives became voiced when occurring between voiced sounds if the immediately preceding vowel was not accented in Proto-Indo-European: formulated 1875 by Karl Verner.
Answered by rajan, 27 Apr '13 06:13 am

 
  
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4.

Verner's law, stated by Karl Verner in 1875, describes a historical sound change in the Proto-Germanic language whereby voiceless fricatives *f, *, *s, *h (including *h ), when immediately following an unstressed syllable in the same word, underwent voicing and became respectively the fricatives *b, *d, *z, *g (and *g).

(In Proto-Germanic, voiced fricatives *[v ] were allophones of their corresponding voiced plosives *[b d ] when they occurred between vowels, semivowels and liquids, so we write them here as *b, *d, *g. But the situations where Verner's law applied resulted in fricatives in these very circumstances, so we understand these phonemes as fricatives in this context.)
Source: google search
Answered by anil garg, 27 Apr '13 02:14 am

 
  
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5.

A statement of the regularity behind some apparent exceptions in the Germanic languages to Grimm's law, namely, that Proto-Germanic voiceless fricatives became voiced when occurring between voiced sounds if the immediately preceding vowel was not accented in Proto-Indo-European: formulated 1875 by Karl Verner.
Answered by Rocking Raaj, 26 Apr '13 08:29 pm

 
  
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6.

Wenz ka mastana lola chaiye;)
Answered by Nirvikaa, 26 Apr '13 08:21 pm

 
  
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