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Q.

What is Limerick in English literature?

Tags: education, books, english literature
Asked by Flying Saucer, 19 Mar 09:20 pm
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Answers (4)

 
1.

These are bawdy,sexy and humourous five line poems.
Answered by amitava duttamajumdar, 20 Mar 03:03 pm

 
  
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2.

A limerick is a form of poetry, especially one in five-line anapestic meter with a strict rhyme scheme (AABBA), which is sometimes obscene with humorous intent. The first two lines rhyme with the last line and the third and fourth line rhyme, and they are usually shorter.
Answered by anil garg, 29 May 12:28 am

 
  
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3.

N From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ',

Poetry groups and movements or schools may be self-identified by the poets that form them or defined by critics who see unifying characteristics of a body of work by more than one poet. To be a 'school' a group of poets must share a common style or a common ethos. A commonality of form is not in itself sufficient to define a school; for example, Edward Lear, George du Maurier and Ogden Nash do not form a school simply because they all wrote limericks.

There are many different 'schools' of poetry. Some of them are described below in approximate chronological sequence. The subheadings indicate broadly the century in which a style arose.

Contents hide
one Prehistoric
two Elizabethan and Shakespearian
three Eighteenth century
four Nineteenth century
five Twentieth century
six Alphabetic list ...more
Answered by Mickey, 19 Mar 10:57 pm

 
  
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N From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ',

Poetry groups and movements or schools may be self-identified by the poets that form them or defined by critics who see unifying characteristics of a body of work by more than one poet. To be a 'school' a group of poets must share a common style or a common ethos. A commonality of form is not in itself sufficient to define a school; for example, Edward Lear, George du Maurier and Ogden Nash do not form a school simply because they all wrote limericks.

There are many different 'schools' of poetry. Some of them are described below in approximate chronological sequence. The subheadings indicate broadly the century in which a style arose.

Contents hide
one Prehistoric
two Elizabethan and Shakespearian
three Eighteenth century
four Nineteenth century
five Twentieth century
six Alphabetic list ...more
Answered by Karan, 19 Mar 09:21 pm

 
  
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