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Q.

What is KIRCHOFFS LAW in electricity ?

Tags: law, electronics, kirchoffs law
Asked by azam khan, 17 Oct '12 10:38 am
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Answers (3)

1.

Kirchhoffs laws of electric circuits
Two simple relationships can be used to determine the value of currents in circuits. They are useful even in rather complex situations such as circuits with multiple loops. The first relationship deals with currents at a junction of conductors with the currents assumed to flow in the directions indicated.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 17 Oct '12 11:20 am

 
  
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2.

Kirchhoff's Voltage Law describes the distribution of voltage within a loop, or closed conducting path, of an electrical circuit. Specifically, Kirchhoff's Voltage Law states that:
The algebraic sum of the voltage (potential) differences in any loop must equal zero.

voltage differences include those associated with electromagnetic fields (emfs) and resistive elements, such as resistors, power sources (i.e. batteries) or devices (i.e. lamps, televisions, blenders, etc.) plugged into the circuit.
Kirchhoff's Voltage Law comes about because the electrostatic field within an electric circuit is a conservative force field. As you go around a loop, when you arrive at the starting point has the same potential as it did when you began, so any increases and decreases along the loop have to cancel out for a total change of 0. If it didn't, then the potential at the start/end point would have two different values.
Answered by iqbal seth, 17 Oct '12 10:44 am

 
  
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3.

Kirchhoff's circuit laws are two equalities that deal with the conservation of charge and energy in electrical circuits, and were first described in 1845 by Gustav Kirchhoff.Widely used in electrical engineering, they are also called Kirchhoff's rules or simply Kirchhoff's laws
Answered by ankit shivam, 17 Oct '12 10:39 am

 
  
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