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Q.

What is Gadhaspatashati? A brief description on it ?

Tags: gadhaspatashati
Asked by sudhakar kuruvada, 26 Feb '13 05:19 pm
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Answers (3)

1.

The contribution of the Andhras to all-India literature is equally impressive. Foremost to deserve mention is the GadhaSaptasati Kavya. This is a great Prakrit collection of verses, aone at the instance of the Satavahana monarch Hala. It conditions poems of exquisite beauty replete with love, humour and pathos. Several of the poets whose writings were collected in Gadha-Saptasati must have been Andhras. Andhra life is well pictured in these verses. Another great Prakrit work the Brihat-katha was the store-house of story literature; This was written by Gunadhya and received the patronage of a Satavahana King
Answered by LIPSIKA, 26 Feb '13 05:23 pm

 
  
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2.

The Gatha asatasati is a collection of poems in Maharashtri Prakrit.

The poems mostly have love as a theme. Many of the poems are by women.

The collection is attributed to the king Hla, as are about forty of the poems in it. It is estimated to date from between 200 BCE and 200 CE. It consists of 700 single-verse poems, divided into 7 chapters of 100 verses each. It names 278 poets; about half the poems are anonymous. All the poems are couplets, and most are in the arya metre.

The first critical edition of the Sattasa was by Albrecht Weber in 1881. It is based on seventeen manuscripts, and contains 964 poems in total, of which 430 are common to all manuscripts. Weber was also the first person to translate the poems into a European language (into German), but his translation was published in journals and not as a separate book. The only English translation to include 700 verses (1700 of Weber's edition) is by Radhagovinda Basak in 1970 There is also a Sanskrit translation of ...more
Answered by anantharaman, 26 Feb '13 05:27 pm

 
  
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3.

In conventional poetry, a looking glass (a mirror) is very often used to represent a plain heart. The reason for this is that a mirror or a looking glass reflects the image as it is and it neither does hide anything nor distorts (in general) anything. This reflecting quality has, therefore, been considered as plainness and used likewise.

However, one poet of gaatha saptaSati days used this looking glass simile very differently. In this gaatha a young woman was lamenting about the insensitiveness of her man, probably her husband, and the imagery the poet used to drive the pathos effectively was the looking glass.
Answered by Psycho, 26 Feb '13 05:21 pm

 
  
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