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Q.

What is difference between a customer and a client ?

Tags: money, technology, law & legal
Asked by Ghost Singh, 09 May '13 05:20 pm
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Answers (6)

 
1.

A customer (sometimes known as a client, buyer, or purchaser) is the recipient of a good, service, product, or idea, obtained from a seller, vendor, or supplier for a monetary or other valuable consideration.

Customer can be Internal customer( in manufacturing the Next process owner) and externa lcustomer.

Client can be termed as a customer also;
The party for which professional services are rendered, as by an attorney.
A customer or patron: clients of the hotel.
A person using the services of a social services agency.
One that depends on the protection of another.
A client state.
Computer Science A computer or program that can download files for manipulation, run applications, or request application-based services from a file server.
Answered by Life to, 09 May '13 05:29 pm

 
  
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2.

A customer could be one time buyer but a client is a long tern buyer of your goods or services
Answered by rajan, 10 May '13 07:03 am

 
  
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3.

Customer refered to businessmen while client to professionals
Answered by Ramesh Agarwal, 09 May '13 08:31 pm

 
  
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4.

Substantially, not much but as we all know on some level, the exchange of currency for goods and services is more about the style than the substance. Savvy merchants have blurred the distinction in the interests of encouraging business by conferring prestige on potential purchasers.
First, word origins: Customers root word, custom, ultimately derives from the Latin verb consuescere, to accustom, and the sense of a person who buys something from another perhaps stems from the idea of purchasing as being a habit. Client (the plural can be clients or clientele) also comes from Latin, in the form of clientem, follower, which may be related to the root word of incline. This sense persists in the phrase client state, referring to a nation dependent on another for security or other support.
The two terms have traditionally differed widely in usage: A customer is simply a recipient of products or services in exchange for money. Even though the relationship to the provider might be long last ...more
Answered by Quest, 09 May '13 06:17 pm

 
  
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5.

Customer ki jeb Vyapari khali karate hai....Client ki jeb consultants khali karate hai....
Answered by SHRIRAM KULKARNI, 09 May '13 05:24 pm

 
  
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6.

Well, they are all customers really but a client is more of a business term for a person who returns again to their business and who they have regular dealings with, including lawyers,doctors, beauticians, banks etc. A consumer is someone who uses the products, this includes eating,drinking or buying make-up or food and general goods. A customer is anyone who is spending the money!
The nature of company's business determine the uses of either custome or client. For instance if the business of your organisation involved in rendering professional services to people such as lawyers, doctors, Accountant, brokers e.t.c the best for you is client. And for those that involved in selling goods or render other services that is unprofessional then customers is your choice
Answered by vedprakash sharma, 09 May '13 05:24 pm

 
  
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