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Q.

How the word BOYCOTT came into practice?

Tags: boycott
Asked by shambu, 06 Jun '10 12:26 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

Captain Charles Cunningham Boycott was an Englishman working in Ireland. In the 1870s he was farming at Loughmask in County Mayo and serving as a land agent for an absentee English landlord, Lord Earne. This was the time of the campaign organized by the Irish Land League for reform of the system of landholdings. In September 1880, protesting tenants demanded that Captain Boycott give them a substantial reduction in their rents. He refused. Charles Stuart Parnell, the President of the Land League, suggested in a speech that the way to force Boycott to give way was for everyone in the locality to refuse to have any dealings with him. Laborers would not work for him, local shops stopped serving him (food had to be brought in from elsewhere for him and his family), and he even had great trouble getting his letters delivered. In the end, his crops were harvested that autumn through the help of fifty volunteers from the north of the country, who worked under the protection of nine hundred so ...more
Answered by PARTHA PATHAK, 06 Jun '10 12:36 pm

 
  
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2.

When Gefroy Boycott started playing cricket for England.
Answered by gkr, 06 Jun '10 02:00 pm

 
  
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3.

Agree with Mr. Partha..nice answer.
Answered by sumati gayki, 14 Nov '10 10:25 am

 
  
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4.

1. to join together in refusing to deal with, so as to punish, coerce, etc.
2. to refuse to buy, sell, or use: to boycott a newspaper

Origin: after Capt. C. C. Boycott, land agent ostracized by his neighbors during the Land League agitation in Ireland in 1880

noun
an act or instance of boycotting
Answered by anil garg, 06 Jun '10 06:25 pm

 
  
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