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Q.

What is cellular totipotency?

Asked by nilkanta rabha, 29 Sep '08 07:58 pm
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Answers (3)

1.

Totipotency is the ability of a single cell to divide and produce all the differentiated cells in an organism, including extraembryonic tissues. Totipotent cells formed during sexual and asexual reproduction include spores and zygotes. Zygotes are the products of the fusion of two gametes (fertilization). In some organisms, cells can dedifferentiate and regain totipotency. For example, a plant cutting or callus can be used to grow an entire plant.

Human development begins when a sperm fertilizes an egg and creates a single totipotent cell (zygote). In the first hours after fertilization, this cell divides into identical totipotent cells. Approximately four days after fertilization and after several cycles of cell division, these totipotent cells begin to specialize.

Totipotent cells have total potential. They specialize into pluripotent cells that can give rise to most, but not all, of the tissues necessary for fetal development. Pluripotent cells undergo further specialization i ...more
Answered by Rabindranath Sahu, 29 Sep '08 08:07 pm

 
  
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