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Q.

What is a ARCHING HORN ?

Tags: education, environment, cars & bikes
Asked by truth exposed, 18 Mar '13 12:09 pm
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Answers (6)

1.

Arcing horns are used in several countries to provide a path for the power-frequency flashover arc that is off the insulator surfaces.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 18 Mar '13 12:15 pm

 
  
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2.

Arcing horns (sometimes arc-horns) are projecting conductors used to protect insulators on high voltage electric power transmission systems from damage during flashover. Overvoltages on transmission lines, due to atmospheric electricity, lightning strikes, or electrical faults, can cause arcs across insulators (flashovers) that can damage them. The horns encourage the flashover to occur between themselves rather than across of the surface of the insulator they protect.[1] Horns are normally paired on either side of the insulator, one connected to the high voltage part and the other to ground. They are frequently to be seen on insulator strings on overhead lines, or protecting transformer bushings.

The horns can take various forms, such as simple cylindrical rods, circular guard rings, or contoured curves, sometimes known as 'stirrups'.
Source: wiki
Answered by iqbal seth, 18 Mar '13 12:12 pm

 
  
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3.

Arcing horns (sometimes arc-horns) are projecting conductors used to protect insulators on high voltage electric power transmission systems from damage during flashover. Overvoltages on transmission lines, due to atmospheric electricity, lightning strikes, or electrical faults, can cause arcs across insulators (flashovers) that can damage them. The horns encourage the flashover to occur between themselves rather than across of the surface of the insulator they protect.[1] Horns are normally paired on either side of the insulator, one connected to the high voltage part and the other to ground. They are frequently to be seen on insulator strings on overhead lines, or protecting transformer bushings.

The horns can take various forms, such as simple cylindrical rods, circular guard rings, or contoured curves, sometimes known as 'stirrups'.
Answered by Tiaa, 18 Mar '13 12:28 pm

 
  
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4.

Arcing horns (sometimes arc-horns) are projecting conductors used to protect insulators on high voltage electric power transmission
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 18 Mar '13 12:10 pm

 
  
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5.

Arcing horns are used in several countries to provide a path for the power-frequency flashover arc that is off the insulator surfaces.
Answered by Quest, 18 Mar '13 11:10 pm

 
  
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6.

Arcing horns (sometimes arc-horns) are projecting conductors used to protect insulators on high voltage electric power transmission systems from damage during flashover. Overvoltages on transmission lines, due to atmospheric electricity, lightning strikes, or electrical faults, can cause arcs across insulators (flashovers) that can damage them. The horns encourage the flashover to occur between themselves rather than across of the surface of the insulator they protect.[1] Horns are normally paired on either side of the insulator, one connected to the high voltage part and the other to ground. They are frequently to be seen on insulator strings on overhead lines, or protecting transformer bushings.

The horns can take various forms, such as simple cylindrical rods, circular guard rings, or contoured curves, sometimes known as 'stirrups'.
Answered by rajan, 18 Mar '13 01:49 pm

 
  
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