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Q.

What is a black hole?

Tags: education, science, environment
Asked by Shan Real, 08 Jan '10 12:32 am
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Answers (5)

1.

A black hole is a massive astrophysical object with infinite density that exerts such a strong gravitational force that nothing from within its radius can escape, not even light The term black hole was coined in 1968 by physicist John Wheeler and has since been widely accepted as a description of these peculiar astrophysical objects

The existence of mass concentration in dark stars however, where their gravitational force was such that light couldnt escape from them, was first postulated in the late 18th century by Reverend John Mitchell and subsequently in the very late 18th century by Pierre-Simon Laplace Both Mitchell and Laplace arrived at the same conclusion using Newtons theory of gravitation using the notion that light behaved as a particle.
Answered by Joseph Chacko, 08 Jan '10 02:04 am

 
  
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2.

According to the general theory of relativity, a black hole is a region of space from which nothing, including light, can escape. It is the result of the deformation of spacetime caused by a very compact mass. Around a black hole there is an undetectable surface which marks the point of no return, called an event horizon. It is called "black" because it absorbs all the light that comes towards it, reflecting nothing, just like a perfect black body in thermodynamics.[1] Under the theory of quantum mechanics black holes possess a temperature and emit Hawking radiation.

Despite its invisible interior, a black hole can be observed through its interaction with other matter. A black hole can be inferred by tracking the movement of a group of stars that orbit a region in space. Alternatively, when gas falls into a stellar black hole from a companion star, the gas spirals inward, heating to very high temperatures and emitting large amounts of radiation that can be detected from earthbound a ...more
Answered by Pardeep kapoor, 08 Jan '10 12:43 am

 
  
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3.

A black hole was maruti's stomach. See Little hanuman movie.
Answered by Avinash Sharma, 08 Jan '10 12:41 am

 
  
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4.

The star eventually collapses to the point of zero volume and infinite density, creating what is known as a " singularity ". Around the singularity is a region where the force of gravity is so strong that not even light can escape. No information can reach us from this region. It is therefore called a black hole.
Answered by Jiya Sahgal, 08 Jan '10 12:41 am

 
  
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5.

A huge mass from which light cannot escape.
Answered by nargis bhambi, 08 Jan '10 12:35 am

 
  
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